perfectus

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Perfect passive participle of perficiō(carry out, finish; perfect; cause).

Participle[edit]

perfectus m ‎(feminine perfecta, neuter perfectum); first/second declension

  1. achieved, executed, carried out, finished, completed, having been finished or completed; complete
  2. perfected, having been perfected; perfect, excellent, exquisite
  3. brought about, caused, having been brought about or caused
  4. (grammar) perfect

Inflection[edit]

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative perfectus perfecta perfectum perfectī perfectae perfecta
genitive perfectī perfectae perfectī perfectōrum perfectārum perfectōrum
dative perfectō perfectō perfectīs
accusative perfectum perfectam perfectum perfectōs perfectās perfecta
ablative perfectō perfectā perfectō perfectīs
vocative perfecte perfecta perfectum perfectī perfectae perfecta

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • perfectus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • perfectus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.perfectus”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • absolutely perfect: absolutus et perfectus
    • an ideal: undique expleta et perfecta forma
    • to sketch the ideal of an orator: imaginem perfecti oratoris adumbrare
    • Plato's ideal republic: civitas optima, perfecta Platonis
    • a man of profound erudition: vir perfecte planeque eruditus
    • a work of art: artis opus; opus arte factum or perfectum
    • to live a perfect life: virtutis perfectae perfecto munere fungi (Tusc. 1. 45. 109)

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin perfectus.

Adjective[edit]

perfectus m

  1. perfect (faultless, etc.)
    • circa 980, La Vie de Saint Léger
      Perfectus fud in caritet
      He was perfect in terms of charity

Usage notes[edit]

  • The Vie de Saint Léger citation above is the only known recorded usage.