plash

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /plæʃ/
  • Rhymes: -æʃ
    • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English plasch, plasche, from Old English plæsċ (pool, puddle). Cognate with Dutch plas (pool, watering hole). Related also to West Frisian plaskje (to splash, splatter), Dutch plassen (to splash, splatter), German platschen (to splash).

Noun[edit]

plash (plural plashes)

  1. (UK, dialectal) A small pool of standing water; a puddle.
  2. A splash, or the sound made by a splash.
    • 1888, Henry James, The Aspern Papers
      Presently a gondola passed along the canal with its slow rhythmical plash, and as we listened we watched it in silence.
  3. A sudden downpour.
    • 1926, T.E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom, New York: Anchor (1991), p. 206:
      [...] down burst torrents of thick rain and muddied us to the skin. The valley began to run in plashes of water, and Dakhil-Allah urged us across it quickly. [...]

Verb[edit]

plash (third-person singular simple present plashes, present participle plashing, simple past and past participle plashed)

  1. (intransitive) To splash.
  2. (transitive) To cause a splash.
  3. (transitive) To splash or sprinkle with colouring matter.
    to plash a wall in imitation of granite
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English *plasshen, *plaisshen, *plesshen, from Old French plaissier, plessier (to bend). For the noun, compare Middle English plaisshes (hedges forming an enclosure, palisade of hedges or wattles). Compare also pleach.

Noun[edit]

plash (plural plashes)

  1. The branch of a tree partly cut or bent, and bound to, or intertwined with, other branches.

Verb[edit]

plash (third-person singular simple present plashes, present participle plashing, simple past and past participle plashed)

  1. (transitive) To cut partly, or to bend and intertwine the branches of.
    to plash a hedge
  2. (transitive) To bend down a bough (in order to pick fruit from it).
    • 1679, John Bunyan, Pilgrim's Progress, Second Part: Some of the trees hung over the wall, and my brother did plash and eat.

Anagrams[edit]