quintus

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See also: Quintus

Latin[edit]

Latin ordinal numbers
 <  4th 5th 6th  > 
    Cardinal : quinque
    Ordinal : quintus
    Adverbial : quinquiēs
    Multiplier : quinquiplex
    Distributive : quīnī

Etymology[edit]

Earlier quinctus, from quinque ‎(five), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

quintus m ‎(feminine quinta, neuter quintum); first/second declension

  1. (ordinal) fifth, the ordinal number after quartus 'fourth' and before sextus 'sixth'

Declension[edit]

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative quintus quinta quintum quintī quintae quinta
genitive quintī quintae quintī quintōrum quintārum quintōrum
dative quintō quintō quintīs
accusative quintum quintam quintum quintōs quintās quinta
ablative quintō quintā quintō quintīs
vocative quinte quinta quintum quintī quintae quinta

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Noun[edit]

quintus

  1. (music, in a piece of vocal polyphony) the fifth voice added to the bass, cantus, tenor, and alto

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

References[edit]

  • quintus in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • quintus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • QUINTUS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • quintus in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) every fifth year: quinto quoque anno
    • (ambiguous) in the fifth year from the founding of the city: anno ab urbe condita quinto
  • quintus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • quintus in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray