regnant

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See also: régnant

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French regnant and its source, the present participle of Latin regnāre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

regnant (not comparable)

  1. Reigning, ruling; currently holding power. [from 15th c.]
    • 1910, A. M. Fairbairn, Studies in Religion and Theology, page 99
      The people are now the State, their will is the regnant will, and that will has this characteristic — it loves principles, it hates compromises; and the principles it loves must be regulative, fit to be applied to the work and guidance of life.
  2. Dominant, holding sway; holding particular power or influence. [from 17th c.]
    • 2010, Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22, Atlantic 2011, p. 7:
      The doors of his temples were kept open in time of war, the time in which the ideas of contradiction and conflict are most naturally regnant.

Noun[edit]

regnant (plural regnants)

  1. (obsolete) A sovereign or ruler.
    • Sir Walter Scott, The Abbot (chapter VI)
      Here are two sovereigns in the land, a regnant and a claimant - that is enough of one good thing - but if any one wants more, he may find a king in every peelhouse in the country; so if we lack government, it is not for lack of governors.

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

regnant

  1. present participle of regnar

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

rēgnant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of rēgnō