sequel

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See also: séquel

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French séquelle [1], from Latin sequela, from sequi (to follow).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsiːkwəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːkwəl

Noun[edit]

sequel (plural sequels)

  1. (dated) The events, collectively, which follow a previously mentioned event; the aftermath.
    • John Bunyan (1678) The Pilgrim's Progress: “Now here Christian was worse put to it than in his fight with Apollyon, as by the sequel you shall see.”
  2. (narratology) A narrative that is written after another narrative set in the same universe, especially a narrative that is chronologically set after its predecessors, or (perhaps improper usage) any narrative that has a preceding narrative of its own.
  3. (Scotland, historical) Thirlage.
  4. (obsolete) A person's descendants.

Antonyms[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ sequel” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From English sequel, from Middle French séquelle, from Latin sequela, from sequi (to follow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sequel m inan

  1. (narratology) sequel

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • sequel in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • sequel in Polish dictionaries at PWN