shend

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English shenden, from Old English sċendan (to put to shame, blame, disgrace), from Proto-West Germanic *skandijan (to scold, berate), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kem- (to cover). Cognate with Dutch schenden (to infringe, profane, defile), German schänden (defile). Related to Old English sċand (infamy, shame, scandal). More at shand, shame.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʃɛnd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

Verb[edit]

shend (third-person singular simple present shends, present participle shending, simple past and past participle shent)

  1. (obsolete) To disgrace or put to shame.
  2. (archaic) To blame.
  3. (archaic) To destroy; to spoil.
  4. (archaic) To overpower; to surpass.
    • 1880, Richard Francis Burton, Os Lusíadas, volume II, page 339:
      Since sware the Parcæ unto me, their friend, / they shall adore my name, my favour prize; / and, as their feats of armèd prowess shend / all feats of rival Rome, I lief devise / some mode of aidance in what things I may, / far as our force o'er man extendeth sway.

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