shide

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See also: shíde, shídé, shìde, and shǐde

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English shide, schide, schyde (plank, board, beam, splinter, chip), from Old English sċīd (thin slip of wood, shingle, billet), from Proto-Germanic *skīdą (log, tile), from Proto-Indo-European *skeyt-, *skey- (to cut; divide; separate; split). Cognate with North Frisian skeid (billet of wood), German Scheit (log, piece of wood), Swedish skid (wooden shoe, sole, skate), Icelandic skíð (a billet of wood). Doublet of ski.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

shide (plural shides)

  1. (obsolete) A piece of wood (a thin board or plan, or a strip of wood split off); a measure of firewood, variously defined as e.g. four feet long and between 16 and 38 inches in circumference.
    • 1566, Accounts of St. Dunstan's, Canterbury:
      For a tall shyde and nayle for the same house, jd,
    • 1601, An Acte concerninge the Assise of Fewell (Chapter XIV, 43* Eliz. c. 14,15.), in The Statutes of the Realm ... From Original Records (1819), page 982:
      And [although] by the true intente of the said Statue everie Bende of Faggot should be Three Foote, [] the said evill disposed people doe [make] the saide Bendes or Faggots stickes much shorter, [] And that everie Tall Shide marked Two, beinge rounde bodied, shall conteine in compasse Three and twentie Inches of Assise aboute, []
    • 1791, Parl. Commission on Royal Forests, in Reports (1863) VI., page 339:
      A quantity of pollard trees to make 1200 shides of cleft wood, computed to contain half a foot of wood or timber in each.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

shide

  1. Alternative form of schide