sica

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See also: Sica and šica

Italian[edit]

Rievocazione storica di un gladiatore tracio armato di sica – Historical reenactment of a Thracian gladiator armed with a sica

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin sīca.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsi.ka/, [ˈs̪iːkä]
  • Stress: sìca
  • Hyphenation: si‧ca

Noun[edit]

sica f (plural siche)

  1. (Ancient Rome, weaponry) A curved dagger typically associated with the Thracians.

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly from Proto-Albanian *tsikā (whence Albanian thikë (knife)), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱey- (to sharpen) possibly via Illyrian.[1] De Vaan declares any connection to Proto-Indo-European * sek- (to cut) to be formally impossible.[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sīca f (genitive sīcae); first declension

  1. a poniard, a curved dagger
  2. the edge of a boar's tusk
    Cum arbore et saxo apri exacuant dentium sicas.
    Boars may sharpen the edge of their tusks using tree and stone.

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative sīca sīcae
genitive sīcae sīcārum
dative sīcae sīcīs
accusative sīcam sīcās
ablative sīcā sīcīs
vocative sīca sīcae

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “thikë”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, pages 477-478
  2. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “sīca”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 561-562
  • sica in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sica in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “sica”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • sica” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to plunge a dagger, knife in some one's heart: sicam, cultrum in corde alicuius defigere (Liv. 1. 58)
  • sica in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sica in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin