smake

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English smaken ‎(to smack, taste), partly from Old English smacian ‎(to smack, pat, caress) and partly from Middle English smake, smac ‎(smack, taste, flavour), from Old English smæc, smæcc ‎(taste, flavour). Cognate with Scots smak ‎(to taste, scent, smell). More at smack, smatch.

Verb[edit]

smake ‎(third-person singular simple present smakes, present participle smaking, simple past and past participle smaked)

  1. (transitive) To smack; taste.
    • 1882, Bricktop, The trip of the Sardine Club:
      Even Bill Bitters could not find it in his heart to say a word against this moisture, and he actually smaked his lips, although he turned away lest someone should see him do it.
    • 1893, Margaret Sidney, Five little Peppers Midway:
      Now, that's good," smaking his lips in a pleased way.
    • 1918, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers (U.S.), Locomotive engineers journal:
      He smaked his lips in anticipation of the coming treat.
    • 1922, Lucy Fox Robins Lang, Mrs. Lucy Robins, War Shadows:
      It is not a nice place to look at, rough you know,” he smiled, and his right eye winked at Frayne: “But the corned beef and cabbage, and the waffles. Mm!” He smaked his lips with desire.
    • 2001, James Joyce, Dubliners:
      "And what about the address to the King?" said Mr. Lyons, after drinking and smaking his lips.

Noun[edit]

smake ‎(plural smakes)

  1. A smack; taste; scent.
    • 1831, Congressional edition:
      The 15th we came to Hatorask, in thirty-six degrees and a terse, at four fadom, three leagues from the shore, where we might perceive a smake at the place where I left the colony, 1587."
    • 1856, Edward Augustus Bond, Giles Fletcher, Sir Jerome Horsey, Russia at the close of the sixteenth century:
      A smake there is in other things, but small purpose.

Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

smake

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of smaken

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English smaken "to taste" from smak "a taste, flavor" from Old English smæc ‎(taste, smack). More at smack

Noun[edit]

smake

  1. taste
  2. flavor

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Low German smaken

Verb[edit]

smake ‎(imperative smak, present tense smaker, simple past smakte, past participle smakt, present participle smakende)

  1. to taste (something)

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]