straight from the horse's mouth

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

This idiom comes from British horse-racing circles, likely because the the presumed ideal source for racing tips would be the horse rather than spectators or riders.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adverb[edit]

straight from the horse's mouth (not comparable)

  1. (idiomatic) Directly from the source; firsthand.
    If you don't believe me, go talk to him and hear it straight from the horse's mouth. It's true.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Modifies verbs like "hear" and "get"

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

straight from the horse's mouth (not comparable)

  1. (idiomatic) firsthand; direct; from the source.
    This is straight from the horse's mouth.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Oxford dictionary of idioms[1], Judith Siefring, 2nd ed edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004, →ISBN, OCLC 56654713