tolk

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See also: tõlk

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse tulkr, from Middle Low German tolk, from Old East Slavic тълкъ (tŭlkŭ), from Proto-Slavic *tъlkъ. This word has also been borrowed to Icelandic túlkur, Norwegian tolk, Swedish tolk, and Dutch tolk.

Noun[edit]

tolk c (singular definite tolken, plural indefinite tolke)

  1. interpreter
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

tolk

  1. imperative of tolke

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tɔlk/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: tolk
  • Rhymes: -ɔlk

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch tolic, from Middle High German tolk, from Old East Slavic тълкъ (tŭlkŭ), толкъ (tolkŭ), from Proto-Slavic *tъlkъ.

Noun[edit]

tolk m (plural tolken, diminutive tolkje n)

  1. An interpreter, one who translates/interprets speech in another language and vice versa
  2. Any content interpreter, who explains
  3. (figuratively) A spokesperson.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
  • tolk-ambtenaar m
  • tolkencollege n
  • tolkdienst, tolkendienst
  • tolkenreglement n
  • Descendants[edit]
    • Afrikaans: tolk

    Etymology 2[edit]

    From tol (spinning top).

    Alternative forms[edit]

    Noun[edit]

    tolk m (plural tolken, diminutive tolkje n)

    1. (obsolete) A sailors' term for a (folding) rule to measure bolt holes

    Anagrams[edit]


    Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

    Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia no

    Etymology 1[edit]

    Via Middle Low German tolk and Old Norse tulkr from Old East Slavic тълкъ (tŭlkŭ), from Proto-Slavic *tъlkъ.

    Noun[edit]

    tolk m (definite singular tolken, indefinite plural tolker, definite plural tolkene)

    1. an interpreter
    Related terms[edit]

    References[edit]

    Etymology 2[edit]

    Verb[edit]

    tolk

    1. imperative of tolke

    Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

    Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia nn

    Etymology[edit]

    Via Middle Low German tolk and Old Norse tulkr from Old East Slavic тълкъ (tŭlkŭ), from Proto-Slavic *tъlkъ.

    Noun[edit]

    tolk m (definite singular tolken, indefinite plural tolkar, definite plural tolkane)

    1. an interpreter

    Related terms[edit]

    References[edit]


    Swedish[edit]

    Etymology[edit]

    Ultimately from Old East Slavic тълкъ (tŭlkŭ), from Proto-Slavic *tъlkъ.

    Pronunciation[edit]

    Noun[edit]

    tolk c

    1. An interpreter, person who translates between two languages back and forth

    Declension[edit]

    Declension of tolk 
    Singular Plural
    Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
    Nominative tolk tolken tolkar tolkarna
    Genitive tolks tolkens tolkars tolkarnas

    Related terms[edit]

    Anagrams[edit]