traverser

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

traverse +‎ -er

Noun[edit]

traverser (plural traversers)

  1. One who, or that which, traverses or moves, such as an index on a scale.
  2. (law) One who traverses, or denies.
  3. (rail transport) A traverse table.
    • 1961 March, "Dalmore", “Driving and firing modern French steam locomotives”, in Trains Illustrated, page 148:
      Before I left Paris I had the chance to visit La Chapelle depot. I was fascinated by the place. Basically, the steam depot is divided into two halves, the repair side and the steam side, with a traverser in between.
    • 2019 October, “Trackwatch: Wales”, in Modern Railways, page 90:
      The outside sidings and test areas are rail-connected at the western end to the Down Service line, whilst the test area and assembly area are connected via a traverser at the eastern end of the site.

References[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for traverser in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tʁa.vɛʁ.se/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

traverser

  1. to cross, to go across

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Old French[edit]

Verb[edit]

traverser

  1. to traverse; to cross; to go across

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ss, *-st are modified to s, st. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: traverse
  • French: traverser

References[edit]