trifold

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English[edit]

Trifold (display board)
Trifold used for passenger list
Trifold (wallet)

Etymology[edit]

tri- +‎ -fold

Adjective[edit]

trifold (not comparable)

  1. threefold
  2. Of a mirror: having three reflective surfaces hinged together.

Noun[edit]

trifold (plural trifolds)

  1. Any sheet of paper or cardboard, folded into three sections along two parallel creases and used to present information, typically as a brochure or display board.
    • 1993, Funworld - Volume 9, page 169:
      Are saddlestitched double-fold brochures more effective than simple trifolds?
    • 2002, Karen Kellaher, Story Writing: Grades 2-3, →ISBN, page 26:
      Before moving on to other aspects of story writing, have students create Character-Plot-Setting trifolds with ready-to-use tips on developing these three vital story elements.
    • 2005, Wendy Saul, Beyond the Science Fair: Creating a Kids' Inquiry Conference, page 5:
      That is, there is no pressure on parents to create high-end trifolds. Every student who puts in the effort gets to shine.
    • 2013, Ask a Tech Teacher, How to Achieve the Common Core with Tech: Writing Strand, →ISBN, page 43:
      How does a trifold help student organize thinking so communication is clearer?
    • 2014, International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept, Bolivia: Fiscal Transparency Assessment, →ISBN:
      Cards, bifolds and trifolds with information on public finances, debt, municipal finances, and other economic issues.
  2. A wallet with three equal-sized sections that fold together.
    • 1976, Clothes - Volume 11, Issues 16-24, page 61:
      Trifolds and credit card hip wallets have been interchangeably in the second slot for several seasons, and this Christmas it appeared that trifold sales edged ahead by a nose.
    • 1978, Men's Wear - Volume 176, page 33:
      A Dante spokesman estimated about 10 percent of the increase was attributable to higher prices. Best selling items were flatfolds and trifolds.
    • 1998 July, Robert Frick, “What Your Wallet Says About You”, in Kiplinger's Personal Finance, volume 52, number 7, page 97:
      A 1996 survey showed that men under age 20 buy three times as many trifolds as bifolds. So a trifold wallet becomes a habit, even after it has expanded to the size and shape of a jumbo bar of soap.
  3. Anything folded into thirds to resemble a trifold.
    • 1974, Spectrum - Volumes 50-51, page 26:
      Three plywood portable trifolds covered with burlap were assembled with hinges to divide the room at the pleasure of the displayers.
    • 1976, George Miller, Dorothy B. Ryan, & Dorothy Miller, Picture postcards in the United States, 1893-1918, page 149:
      Panoramic cards (two cards, folded) and trifolds (three cards) were occasionally issued in the Photochrome series and are rare finds today.
    • 1990, Rebecca Wittman, Brightwork: The Art of Finishing Wood, →ISBN, page 145:
      For handsanding detail areas, fold sandpaper quarters into trifolds.
    • 2008, Chefs Association of the Pacific Coast, Inc., The Culinarian - Volume 53, page 9:
      Holding strictly to the highest classical French standards, Grand Marque® Pate Feuilletee is made with 6 trifolds, yielding 1459 alternating layers of dough and Plugra® butter.
    • 2009, Niama Leslie Williams & Joseph William Massey, Joseph's Story, →ISBN, page 145:
      I close the door behind me and let the tears ride down my cheeks as I make trifolds of underwear, sheets and towels.
    • 2012, Chris Pavone, The Expats, →ISBN:
      There was a steel napkin dispenser, the napkins themselves those little trifolds that manage to be both flimsy and sturdy at the same time, which seems impossible, but is not.

Anagrams[edit]