Penelope

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Translingual[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Proper noun[edit]

Penelope f

  1. A taxonomic genus within the family Cracidae.

References[edit]

  • 2006, Gill, F. and Wright, M., Birds of the World: Recommended English Names, Princeton University Press, ISBN 978-0691128276:

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Πηνελόπη, possibly from πηνέλοψ (pēnélops), “duck”.

Proper noun[edit]

Penelope

  1. (Greek mythology) The faithful wife of Odysseus.
    • ~1608 William Shakespeare: Coriolanus: Act I, Scene III:
      You would be another Penelope; yet, they say, all the yarn she spun in Ulysses' absence did but fill Ithaca with moths.
  2. A female given name.
    • 2004 Alice Munro, Runaway:Stories, Knopf (2004), page 93:
      "What's her name?" He meant the baby's. "Penelope. We're never going to call her Penny. Penelope." - - - ""Oh. Well, it's Penelope Henderson - Porteous I guess. Or Porteous - Henderson. But maybe that's too much of a mouthful, when she's already called Penelope? We knew that we wanted Penelope. We'll have to settle it somehow."

Translations[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • Popular given name in the U.K. in the 1950s and the 1960s.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges: A Concise Dictionary of First Names. Oxford University Press 2001.