Wiktionary:Feedback

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This page is for collecting feedback from Wiktionary readers. It should be cleaned out regularly, as new comments are constantly being added. Feel free to reply to and discuss comments here, though bear in mind that the people who leave the feedback may never come back to read replies.

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Contents

December 2014[edit]

Wiktionary:Feedback[edit]

I think it would be better if the site can have more information that I need and want, such as some geographic terms, scientific concepts and Chinese writing skills. Also, sometimes the content of the information will decrease when I translate the page into other languages and it causes me use extra time to find of another website that has more detail information. So these are my opinions to Wiktionary, hope the website has improvements when I surf it next time.

You do know that this is a dictionary, don't you? For more information on some topics, see Wikipedia. Please let us know if there are geographic or scientific terms that are missing from Wikitionary. We try to have all words in all languages, but there is still some way to go. Dbfirs 16:07, 2 December 2014 (UTC)

Did anyone notice the phonetic spelling of Wiktionary should probably be "wɪkʃ(ə)n(ə)ɹɪ", similar to Dictionary? I could be wrong but isn't it missing a vowel?

[edit]

I deleted my question because right after I posted it I saw all the other questions about exactly the same thing and the (irritated) response of the creator. Sorry for asking the same question, but I'm still of a mind that the [r] should change. It's not that hard to edit the picture with Photoshop..? Futhermore, thank you so much, it's a great website, helps a lot with the curiosity for languages.

I've put your heading back, just so that people know what it was that you commented on. The logo was created a long time ago (long before I knew that Wiktionary existed) by Brion Vibber, a MediaWiki developer, and discussions about it have been continuing for more than ten years (see Wiktionary talk:Wiktionary Logo). Apparently there are alternatives available - see [1] for designs that are used in Wiktionaries in other languages. I suspect that the [r] in the current logo was placed there before we decided on using the non-rhotic version in our IPA. I'd have no objection to changing to the tiles logo, but previous discussions and votes seem to have stalled. Dbfirs 21:18, 3 December 2014 (UTC)

chagrin[edit]

Thank you very much. For making this amazing web-site. It helped me a lot. Especially with my homework, when I needed to know what does some words mean.

Special:Search[edit]

thanks for this active cooperation and advanced searching.--101.221.129.8 16:41, 5 December 2014 (UTC)sayonara

Special:Search adopted Google search[edit]

Add Google search running on your servers

This is not likely to happen because Google's product isn't free / open source. Equinox 14:33, 6 December 2014 (UTC)
Plus, Google is evil. We shouldn't condone evil. Tharthan (talk) 17:55, 6 December 2014 (UTC)

swedge[edit]

You are the only online dictionary I found to include the word "swedge"--thanks!

It's an old word (and appears in the OED). I've added a usage by Rudyard Kipling. Dbfirs 22:04, 9 December 2014 (UTC)

Wiktionary:Per-browser preferences[edit]

It would be helpful, if you could develop a speak button that pronounces the words found in the dictionary. and, for your foreign word of the day...thanks, lovin' on some Wiki...

Wiktionary:Per-browser preferences[edit]

I strongly prefer Desktop view on iPad. This site (wiktionary.org) always Displays pages in Mobile view even after I switch to Desktop and click the Save button. Please make it easier to switch to Desktop view. Please create a preference for "prefer Desktop view on this device"

escoar[edit]

Is this the exact same word in Old Portuguese? --66.190.99.112 05:48, 14 December 2014 (UTC)

quadrature of the circle[edit]

Did Greek geometers not know about Babylonian value of Pi and straight edge construction of quadrature of a circle ?

They repeatedly tried to find better constructions, without precise success, of course, because it was proved impossible in 1882. Dbfirs 22:14, 14 December 2014 (UTC)

machine[edit]

An outdated or simply "dated" term used in the US during the 30s and 40s is the word "machine" meaning motor vehicle or car/automobile. Difficult finding this reference anywhere. Ideas? Robert Bushee <email redacted>

Here’s one. —Stephen (Talk) 23:20, 14 December 2014 (UTC)
Not usable to cite the English word, but ماشین (masin) is "car" in Persian, borrowed from French at some stage. Equinox 22:25, 16 December 2014 (UTC)
In Russian маши́на (mašína) also means "car" but also "machine". Persian may have borrowed the term ماشین (mâšin) via Russian. --Anatoli T. (обсудить/вклад) 13:51, 19 December 2014 (UTC)
In German Maschine is often used to mean "airplane", but not "car" as far as I know. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 17:04, 19 December 2014 (UTC)

mais encore[edit]

Is this worthy of a dictionary entry? It seems idiomatic (in my opinion). --66.190.99.112 17:04, 15 December 2014 (UTC)

apologize[edit]

Apologize is an alternate form of Apologise. Not the other way around.

They're alternative forms of each other. Neither is more correct than the other, though the spelling with z is closer to the Greek original ἀπολογίζομαι (apologízomai). —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 21:55, 15 December 2014 (UTC)
Yes, both spellings have been in use for over 400 years. The Greek ἀπολογεῖσθαι (apologeîsthai) could be a reason for using the s form. Dbfirs 22:02, 16 December 2014 (UTC)
Well, no; the earliest -ize words (such as baptize) came to English through the intermediaries of Latin and French, so a Greek middle infinitive is unlikely to have had any influence. I'm pretty sure the -ise variant was taken over from French -iser while the -ize variant came straight from Latin -izō. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 22:20, 16 December 2014 (UTC)
Thanks for the correction, and I agree with your view of the derivation, but why, then, do we have this insistence on going back to Greek forms? Dbfirs 20:29, 17 December 2014 (UTC)
Who knows? I could equally ask why we have this insistence on using French spellings. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 21:33, 17 December 2014 (UTC)

daughter[edit]

Re 'daughter, I learned from a Sanskrit scholar that the term derives from the Sanskrit word for 'female offspring' or perhaps '(female) offspring who collects the milk.' Apparently in ancient Indian times it was customary for the female offspring to milk the cows. The pronunciation for this was 'dochter' where the 'ch' sounds as it does in 'loch'.

  • The English word does not come from Sanskrit. The English word derives from Proto-Indo-European (PIE). Sanskrit is a related branch of PIE, and thus many words in Sanskrit might still closely resemble words in modern English, such as English daughter and Sanskrit दुहितृ (duhitṛ). (Other cognate words are very different, such as English wheel and Sanskrit चक्र (cakra).) ‑‑ Eiríkr Útlendi │ Tala við mig 22:12, 15 December 2014 (UTC)

Appendix:Glossary of collective nouns by subject[edit]

This page has many incorrect entries —This comment was unsigned.

Unfortunately yes, it has. Equinox 03:06, 17 December 2014 (UTC)

[edit]

環 This is a seventeen stroke kanji but it is listed under thirteen strokes on the following page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_kanji_by_stroke_count. I do not know how to change it but hopefully somebody that reads this can.

disorder[edit]

12/17/2014 Hello: Thank you for your hard work and available translations (in Russian). It would be interested to see your versions and clarification for: PTSD [disorder] and PTSI [injuries]. and if MULTIPLE Accidents are do take any places in this two abbreviations PTSD & PTSI ... Or those abbreviations are exclusively related to Mental Health. Somebody showed me PTSD - Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - had a brake down Post>After; Traumatic>etc. If you have a clarifications that available I would like to read that.

Thank you in advance.

A.K. (310) 779-2428 :-)

See PTSD, posttraumatic stress disorder, and w:Posttraumatic stress disorder. —Stephen (Talk) 09:33, 19 December 2014 (UTC)

[edit]

For the Chinese character lookup results, under the Mandarin section, it would be very helpful if you include the zhuyin pronunciation as well. Thank you.

Lenny[edit]

Hi wiktionary folks , i would like to have a list of dimunitives of christian names... i want to know where i can get it... if it is possible for you, compile a list of christian names dimunitives and send an email to [email redacted] Thanks for your kind help

Category:English diminutives of male given names and Category:English diminutives of female given names has what you're looking for. I've removed your email address to stop you getting spammed. Smurrayinchester (talk) 14:28, 18 December 2014 (UTC)

hippopotomonstrosesquipedaliophobia[edit]

Why is this word so long? People that are afraid of long words are afraid of that word just so you know...

Yes, we get the joke. It's a made-up word, of course, and doesn't appear yet in "respectable" dictionaries or in Wikipedia's List of phobias, but the fact that the joke has appeared in three independent publications spanning more than a year means that Wiktionary includes an entry. Perhaps other dictionaries will follow in time? Many words that started as jokes are now regarded as legitimate. Dbfirs 19:51, 18 December 2014 (UTC)
See thusly as an example. --Romanophile (talk) 17:40, 21 December 2014 (UTC)
That's still rather a joke word for some of us in British English, but words such as chortle seem to be accepted. Dbfirs 20:49, 21 December 2014 (UTC)

blivet[edit]

I'm told blivet also has a derogatory nuance, as in a five-pound bag filled with ten pounds of excrement. Piers Anthony was fond of that usage. 81+9=3+4;8+8=4+3.

It's a multi-purpose word that means just what the user wants it to mean, so it tends to be freshly defined in each usage. That definition goes back to 1967 in Wentworth & Flexner's Dictionary of American Slang. Dbfirs 10:25, 21 December 2014 (UTC)

It's a Humpty Dumpty word, then. L for the JW.! cdw+dcv=t.

támogatásra[edit]

suggestion - translation or translation link

Thanks, but that idea is not practical. Támogatásra means "for support", "for assistance", "for encouragement". —Stephen (Talk) 12:42, 21 December 2014 (UTC)

Template:a[edit]

Can we use some other name that's not Received Pronunciation, because every time I read it I interpret it was being the pronunciation as heard rather than as practised. The name is vague at best. --66.190.99.112 23:16, 21 December 2014 (UTC)

It's not really vague, as Received Pronunciation is the name of a very specific accent; but it's much more usually known by the initialism RP than by its full name. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 23:59, 21 December 2014 (UTC)
It’s not vague? How would you ever infer that it’s specifically a British pronunciation? The name doesn’t tell you that. --Romanophile (talk) 01:58, 22 December 2014 (UTC)
Now that fewer than 1 in 50 people in the UK use the Received Pronunciation, isn't it time that we started using "BBC pronunciation" or "General British" for the non-regional accent on this side of the pond? Dbfirs 10:54, 22 December 2014 (UTC)
Since the BBC doesn't require it anymore, "BBC pronunciation" is also a misnomer. Of the alternative names listed at Received Pronunciation, I think "Standard Southern British" is probably the most straightforward, and doesn't have the class-based baggage that "RP" does. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 19:13, 22 December 2014 (UTC)
The BBC doesn't require RP any more (in that they allow regional accents), but there is still a pronunciation that could be called Standard English or General English that is not "Southern", and is recognised (and often spoken) by educated British people from all regions. This pronunciation is no longer the same as Conservative RP. Dbfirs 23:45, 22 December 2014 (UTC)
I think the "Southern" means it's standard in Southern Britain (i.e. England and Wales), not just Southern England, the idea being that even highly educated Scots tend to use Standard Scottish English. (However, I have met educated Scots who do speak something approaching RP, but not very many.) —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 08:42, 26 December 2014 (UTC)
Don't confuse vague and opaque: for anyone familiar with the term it's very clear and precise, just as there are all kinds of technical terms in science that mean nothing to most people, but are extremely precise. Of course, if you're not familiar with the term, you can't guess what it refers to- but that's not vagueness. Chuck Entz (talk) 20:32, 22 December 2014 (UTC)
Unfortunately, the term RP seems to mean different things to differnt people. Dbfirs 23:45, 22 December 2014 (UTC)
I agree it's not vague, it's opaque. Renard Migrant (talk) 15:14, 23 December 2014 (UTC)

combinatietang[edit]

This is a Dutch word.

combinatiesleutel[edit]

This also is a Dutch word.

וןו[edit]

Messy & badly categorized. --66.190.99.112 16:45, 22 December 2014 (UTC)

I fixed up the categories, but otherwise I can't say it seems particularly messy to me. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 19:03, 22 December 2014 (UTC)
But Angr, shouldn't it have a medial nun rather than a final nun? —Μετάknowledgediscuss/deeds 20:32, 27 December 2014 (UTC)
Oops, I didn't notice that. I don't know anything about Ladino, but I suspect you're right. I'd be surprised if Ladino orthography allowed final nun in the middle of a word. User:JSBrowand13 started the entry, what does he say? —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 20:41, 27 December 2014 (UTC)
Also, if Ladino is anything like Yiddish, then a vowel-initial word has to start with aleph, not waw, so I wonder if this should actually be at אונו. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 20:45, 27 December 2014 (UTC)

uterine nephew[edit]

Wiktionary is so use full to find new words thanksto wiki

advertize[edit]

According to http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/ize-ise-or-yse, this spelling is incorrect. However, the Wiktionary entry presents it as a valid spelling. I am reluctant to change anything because, while I know that "advertize" is not valid in BrE, I am less certain about AmE. The entry at advertise calls it "chiefly archaic (US)". Whatever caution or qualification is deemed necessary should be added to the entry at advertize too, because someone coming to simply check spelling validity may not bother to go to advertise. —This unsigned comment was added by 86.152.161.61 (talk) at 14:35, 23 December 2014 (UTC).

Well William Cowper and Horace Walpole both used the z spelling, so it certainly counts as an archaic spelling in British English. It's not clear whether the z spelling is universally regarded as erroneous in US English (as it now is in British English). Merriam-Webster online doesn't include the z spelling, but Collins Dictionary does allow it as an American alternative. I agree that we need a qualification. I've added a usage note as a first suggestion, but it might need adjusting for the American position. What does the full M-W say? Dbfirs 19:45, 23 December 2014 (UTC)
There are a few -ize spellings based on -ise spellings which are nonstandard even in American English. Surprize comes to mind, though that's also unetymological because the final -ise ending of surprise isn't a verbal suffix (supre suffixed with -ise) but based on Old French, Middle French prise, feminine form of pris (taken; seized). Renard Migrant (talk) 20:01, 23 December 2014 (UTC)
The z is unetymological in advertize too, because it isn't advert + -ize. It's definitely not the usual spelling in American English, and if I came across it in something I was proofreading I'd certainly correct it to advertise, but the line between "misspelling" and "rare alternative spelling" is blurry. BGC Ngrams suggests advertise is and always has been about 200 times more common than advertize in US English. And advertisement is about 2000 times more common than advertizement. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 08:46, 26 December 2014 (UTC)

temporary[edit]

You're a wonderful resource.. I hope you do continues and grows; —This unsigned comment was added by 71.99.202.34 (talk) at 02:45, 24 December 2014 (UTC).

schildersplakband[edit]

This is a Dutch word. It means ‘masking tape’.

Thanks for making Wiktionary better, Stephen & CodeCat. It is much appreciated.

открывать[edit]

где голос женщины в странице http://ru.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D0%BE%D1%82%D0%BA%D1%80%D1%8B%D0%B2%D0%B0%D1%82%D1%8C ?

Michael

А что вы имеете в виду? Какая женщина? Там голоса нет. —Stephen (Talk) 01:18, 26 December 2014 (UTC)

olvidar[edit]

This requires examples (in Portuguese). --66.190.99.112 18:45, 26 December 2014 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done. — Ungoliant (falai) 14:44, 27 December 2014 (UTC)
Thanks for all the new entries, they're very useful.

substitute[edit]

"I had to substitute old parts with the new ones" is horrible English, and you do your readers a disservice by presenting it as correct. The statement in the Usage notes that the reader or hearer cannot tell what is meant by "Substitute butter" or "Substitute olive oil" is also incorrect. Perhaps this is true for the reader who does not understand the meaning of the word "substitute", but for anyone who does understand, the meaning is clear. 109.153.232.33 04:50, 27 December 2014 (UTC)

I agree with you about the modern trend to use substitute with instead of replace with, (and the even worse use of "by") but the OED says: "This use was often criticized in the early 20th cent., and replace preferred; N.E.D. (1914) comments: ‘Now regarded as incorrect.’ However this use of substitute (particularly in the passive voice) remains common." so, as a descriptive dictionary, we have to accept that people "misuse" the construction and that this misuse has become "normal". I'd be surprised if many "good" writers use the "horrible" construction. Because of this "misuse", many people no longer understand the correct use of the example in the usage note. Perhaps we could just note that the construction with "with" was formerly proscribed? Dbfirs 11:05, 27 December 2014 (UTC)

Word of the day: hooey[edit]

Nice and helpful to me a lot as a student THANKS!!!!!!!

Word of the day: hooey[edit]

Nice and helpful to me a lot as a student. THANKS!! But i have many questions to clearify, as next time guys but i had a nice time reading as i m a reading BUG!!!!!!!!!! पर मुझे बहुत गय।न िमला ।

coger[edit]

There's something weird underneath the conjugation table. --66.190.99.112 19:46, 27 December 2014 (UTC)

Yes check.svg FixedΜετάknowledgediscuss/deeds 20:28, 27 December 2014 (UTC)

идея[edit]

Hi. I'm an Englishman teaching myself Russian, and rely heavily on online resources. Your stuff on Russian nouns is invaluable (better than Google Translate, IMO, in that it gives gender as well as declension of nouns. Could I make a suggestion? Your Russian Noun pages would greatly improve if you started giving a few example sentences featuring the noun in question. (This could be done piecemeal; I realise you can't possibly do this for all nouns at once.) In any case, please accept my thanks for the service you provide.

Duncan Gilchrist.

Thanks for your feedback. Note that there are currently over 23 thousand Russian lemmas (dictionary forms). Providing a usage example for each term may not be possible and they are encouraged for terms, which may need clarifications in the usage. The term [[идея]] is rather straightforward, almost equivalent of the English [[idea]]. We can add usage examples on request though. I have just added a usage example to [[идея]]. There are still many basic, high frequency Russian terms to be added, which is a priority. --Anatoli T. (обсудить/вклад) 01:14, 28 December 2014 (UTC)

Dell[edit]

Could also refer to a PC from the firm. "I installed Windows 7 on the Dell and 8 in the kitchen." 104.229.142.212 04:09, 28 December 2014 (UTC)

This would need to meet WT:BRAND, which is not inconceivable. Equinox 09:10, 1 January 2015 (UTC)

quehacer[edit]

Is the example perfect Spanish? I can’t find it in either Google Books or Google Groups. --66.190.99.112 04:32, 28 December 2014 (UTC)

Seems fine to me. I would use the plural for this sense (los quehaceres), but in Mexico the singular is used, too. —Stephen (Talk) 08:26, 28 December 2014 (UTC)

ago#Descendants[edit]

I am experiencing difficulties discovering a dictionary that describes the Catalan verb. Is it false? --66.190.99.112 06:33, 28 December 2014 (UTC)

No, it’s true. Agir is borrowed from French and only used in the w:Roussillon area. Usually not conjugated, so usage is confined to the infinitive. —Stephen (Talk) 09:52, 2 January 2015 (UTC)

Wiktionary:Main Page[edit]

Thank you very much for your hard work and zeal to have every information to the readers. My salute to all who have contributed their noble efforts to serve the people of this globe. I can have any information of any type of any country, really commandable efforts put in by your PEOPLE. Thanks again and again.

respiratus[edit]

Please offer more pages in spanish. It is a too widely spoken language and although so many of us understand english, web pages containing information in english may not be offered and filed as proof in legal proceedings according to local legislation. Please consider the above, thank you.

The Spanish Wiktionary is at es:; look there if you need words defined in Spanish. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 22:33, 30 December 2014 (UTC)
The Spanish version now exists. --Romanophile (talk) 23:05, 1 January 2015 (UTC)
Why would you cite Wikitonary as a source for legal matters? That doesn't sound too wise to me... Tharthan (talk) 00:11, 2 January 2015 (UTC)
What would you cite, and why? Renard Migrant (talk) 00:17, 5 January 2015 (UTC)

blivet[edit]

a Humpty Dumpty word, then. L for the JW.! cdw+dcv=t.

I agree with your analysis that it is a Humpty Dumpty word, but I've no idea what the rest of your comment means. Dbfirs 18:15, 31 December 2014 (UTC)

January 2015[edit]

ёб твою мать[edit]

еб

What did you want to say or ask? If it's about the spelling, normally, adult native Russians use letter [[е]] instead of [[ё]] but dictionaries use "ё" to show the correct pronunciation and stress (letter "ё" is stressed in 99% of cases and no stress mark is used over it). Using [[е]] for [[ё]] doesn't affect pronunciation. One still needs to pronounce the letter as [[ё]] but it makes it difficult for learners. You need to know when to pronounce "ё" or "е". --Anatoli T. (обсудить/вклад) 13:08, 1 January 2015 (UTC)

inception[edit]

This is my first time to see this page as I really never explore beyond fbk & emails,I found this page very helpful esp.when confused about word meaning,word use,& word category.I felt that I would visit again,thank you!

not touch something with a ten foot pole[edit]

Where is this etymology from? --66.190.99.112 05:47, 2 January 2015 (UTC)

A ten-foot pole is a metaphoric measure that someone would not touch something or someone else with. First attested in 1839, American English. The ten-foot pole was a common tool used to set stakes for fences, etc., and the phrase "Can't touch de bottom with a ten foot pole" comes from the old minstrel show song "Camptown Races."
"I saw her eat.
"No very unnatural occurrence I should think.
"But she ate an onion!
"Right my boy, right, never marry a woman who would touch an onion with a ten foot pole." —Stephen (Talk) 06:34, 2 January 2015 (UTC)
The British equivalent is a barge pole, but I think we copied the expression from American usage. Dbfirs 16:24, 2 January 2015 (UTC)

Appendix:English internet slang[edit]

nmfys not my fault you suck

[edit]

benoît assou ekkoto aron pálmarsson

económico, econômico[edit]

Do these mean ‘cheap; inexpensive; low in cost; costing little?’ --66.190.99.112 09:59, 3 January 2015 (UTC)

Yes, they can mean that. —Stephen (Talk) 10:05, 3 January 2015 (UTC)

Wiktionary:Requested entries (Hindi)/Multilingual list of Indian family relation names[edit]

Meaning of Wife in Telugu is addressed with a bad word. please remove the below lines Actual meanings:- bhaarya/ penDlaam pooku(peLLAm notlo naadi)/ inTaaviDa/ aaDadi Bad Word : pooku(peLLAm notlo naadi)

The above bad words is really a very bad word !!!

Done. —Stephen (Talk) 09:35, 4 January 2015 (UTC)

Word of the day: cacophonous[edit]

Really could use an audio file to know the correct pronunciation !

There is an audio file. It's right at the bottom of the Pronunciation section. Unfortunately, the audio file is wrong (he's pronouncing it "kercophonous" instead of "cacophonous"), so what we need is a new, correct audio file. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 23:51, 3 January 2015 (UTC)

poepen[edit]

This is quite possibly one of the most disgusting words that I’ve ever seen. --66.190.99.112 11:46, 4 January 2015 (UTC)

Especially sense 3. Ew. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 13:23, 4 January 2015 (UTC)
Are the shit and fart senses really not distinct, that is, should they really not be on different definition lines? Renard Migrant (talk) 00:13, 5 January 2015 (UTC)
Yes, you are right, I've split them. (The above mentioned sense 3 has become sense 4 after the split.) -- Curious (talk) 19:02, 13 January 2015 (UTC)
I LOLed. Please post a list of the other slightly less disgusting words you have seen. Equinox 20:03, 12 January 2015 (UTC)
I am Dutch and I have to say that the sense ‘to fart’ has been obsolete since long before I was born, which, I'm sad to admit, was quite a while ago. —This unsigned comment was added by 82.139.86.190 (talk).
Aah, wat een poepie! – Aww, what a poopy... uh... sweetie! :P


smelt[edit]

I need examples of 'smelt' in a sentence.

Do you need sentences for all five meanings? Dbfirs 22:44, 4 January 2015 (UTC)
"I think we'll get a good yield of iron when we smelt the ore."
"I've never smelt smelt like that smelt smelt."
That should take care of at least three... Chuck Entz (talk) 23:50, 4 January 2015 (UTC)
Very clever, you're no smelt. You deserve a smelt (a half-guinea) for those. Dbfirs 00:29, 5 January 2015 (UTC)

Word of the day: swage[edit]

can you change anyone born in Ukraine and clearly Ukrainian and say they are Ukrainian not Russian. Example. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Igor_Sikorsky This man is a Ukrainian not a Russian. There are many instances of this and this needs to be clear to all. Thank you Ian Frew

This is Wiktionary, not Wikipedia. You need to take that up with them. Chuck Entz (talk) 23:58, 4 January 2015 (UTC)
The one word answer is 'no'. What this has to do with swage, I have no idea. Renard Migrant (talk) 00:09, 5 January 2015 (UTC)

repreparation[edit]

thank you for doing this website happy new year !!!

strong[edit]

This is also pronounced with a /ʃ/. Try looking up ‘shtrong’ if you discredit me. (Also, it appears to be a stigmatized pronunciation.) --66.190.99.112 08:51, 6 January 2015 (UTC)

Yes, as spoken by the inebriated. Dbfirs 10:03, 6 January 2015 (UTC)
Wow. I’m shocked that you would have the audacity to say that. It was my preferred pronunciation for years. Tonight, I even met a woman who pronounced it like this, and nothing about her demeanour indicated that she was intoxicated. --Romanophile (talk) 10:21, 6 January 2015 (UTC)
Well, apologies to you and your lady friend. No slur on either of you was intended. I spoke only from experience. Where in the world is it a common pronunciation? Dbfirs 12:48, 6 January 2015 (UTC)
Well, I was (unfortunately) raised in Texas, and I still reside there (ditto). The woman probably resides here, too, but we don’t have strong accents. I’ve read that this is actually a rather common pronunciation in the United States of America. --Romanophile (talk) 12:57, 6 January 2015 (UTC)
How would you (or she) pronounce "street" or "straw"? Smurrayinchester (talk) 14:43, 6 January 2015 (UTC)
Also with /ʃ/. Pretty much every English instance of str‐ would be pronounced with a /ʃ/. --Romanophile (talk) 14:46, 6 January 2015 (UTC)
Do you say them with [ʃtɹ-] or with [ʃtʃɹ-]? I have difficulty imagining [ʃtɹ-], but [ʃtʃɹ-] is plausible. (I grew up in Texas too, but I say /stɹ/ for all of them.) I'm reluctant to indicate such words as having /ʃ/ at the phonemic level, though, even if they may surface with [ʃ]. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 19:14, 6 January 2015 (UTC)
No, I don’t say [ʃtʃɹ-]. That combination is very difficult for me to pronounce. --Romanophile (talk) 00:55, 7 January 2015 (UTC)
I'm with Angr here - small regular phonemic differences between accents aren't normally worth noting (if not for the nationalist flame wars that would break out, I could even see the argument for merging most UK and US pronunciations). We don't normally give Northern England or Estuary pronunciations for words, because the variation from the RP "dictionary" pronunciation is usually predictable (/ʌ/ to /ʊ/, /t/ to /ʔ/) - it's only worth noting where there's something unusual (see e.g. film). As for /ʃtɹ/, Wikipedia has this sound change as a trait of Pacific Northwest English, but I wouldn't be surprised if it occurs in other accents (it certainly occurs in Sean Connery's!). Smurrayinchester (talk) 14:12, 7 January 2015 (UTC)

richiamare[edit]

I have just discovered Wiktionary. What a wonderful facility! Thank you so much for creating it. The possibility to see a word in its different languages, whether it has a shared etymology or simply a coincidental form, is an enormous leap forward in linguistic research.

decepción[edit]

DRAE indicates that this a synonym of engaño. I can also find (antiquated) Spanish dictionaries that do the same, but the entry disagrees. Maybe the sense of ‘engaño’ is archaic? Is a sense absent from engaño? I don’t get it. --66.190.99.112 12:29, 6 January 2015 (UTC)

There is a special sense of decepción that is a synonym of engaño. It is a recent borrowing from English and is used mainly in military language. It refers to decepción militar and comes from English "military deception", disinformation. In normal Spanish language, decepción does not have this meaning (possibly it did have in archaic usage). —Stephen (Talk) 13:38, 6 January 2015 (UTC)

Template:es-conj-gir[edit]

The template contains a loose parameter. See fingir for example. --66.190.99.112 12:41, 6 January 2015 (UTC)

Foucauldian[edit]

Belgium speaking: sorry for my English knowledge. Here I go: the word Foucauldian is written in a wrong way. The name of the person is Foucault and the only right way for Foucaultian is Foucaultian. I read on internet: Foucauldian sounds better but this is in no respect of the persons name. In this wrong Foucauldian you can hardly recognize the real name of Michel Foucault. The person is dead and cannot defend himself anymore. That's why I do it in his place. All philosophes who uses Foucaldian can discuss as much as they want, they are wrong. They know Freud (Freudian) but they don't know Kant (Kantian).

It's used in English, so we need to document it. See [2]. Equinox 12:49, 7 January 2015 (UTC)

John Thomas[edit]

What the Hell is this? Cockney slang? --66.190.99.112 01:58, 7 January 2015 (UTC)

despejar[edit]

CONJ-TABL=CLEAR[GUD!BUTNEDlinx[2PAGE[S]DADXPLAINVARIESTENS-USAG

scitamenta[edit]

I like the work of everyone and I am really thankfull to the whole society you have built. Just an idea or suggestion I am learning some latin and I think it would be nice if on a long term basis could by searching a word getting its decendents in modern romance languages # somewhere in the related terms

Enjoy 2015)

Love George A. E.

We do include descendants (in its own section, not under derived terms), but I don’t think scitamenta has any. — Ungoliant (falai) 12:17, 7 January 2015 (UTC)

let him who is without sin cast the first stone[edit]

There is a caption under this quote in the scriptures that indicates this story is not found in earlier manuscripts, so where did it come from?

You could just as easily ask where did the original manuscripts come from. Renard Migrant (talk) 19:47, 12 January 2015 (UTC)

Godspeed[edit]

According to all other (definition) websites, the term "godspeed" has nothing to do with God, rather it is a form of a phrase that has been shorten from the original "good speed", an old English term wishing well to travelers embarking on a long/perilous journey.

I don't know what unreliable websites you have been reading, but neither the Oxford English Dictionary nor the Merriam-Webster dictionary agrees with your opinion. Dbfirs 21:36, 7 January 2015 (UTC)

[edit]

I think Chinese information is far more in arrears than English.And Chinese information is also uncomplete.Especially comes to tech information.

I disagree. What is missing in your opinion? --Anatoli T. (обсудить/вклад) 00:25, 16 January 2015 (UTC)

insofar[edit]

very happy with wiktionary. IPA and the ability to hear words are crucial. Rock on!

Fetzen[edit]

The translation "lump" is in error. Both FETZEN and LUMPEN in German mean "rags", "scraps of cloth" -- LUMPENPROLETARIAT, the ragged-trousered working classes. Please consider changing this page.

Thanks! I've corrected the page. Smurrayinchester (talk) 10:58, 8 January 2015 (UTC)

make[edit]

  1. (intransitive, now mostly colloquial) To behave, to act.
    To make like a deer caught in the headlights.
    They made nice together, as if their fight never happened.
    He made as if to punch him, but they both laughed and shook hands.

Any reason why this specialised and relatively unusual meaning is first in the list? Shouldn't the core meaning be first?

Some here may agree with you, that the core or most common meaning should be first. I, however, prefer to see it as most dictionaries arrange them, by original or oldest first, and so forth. Doing it this way allows you to see how the senses evolved over time and why and how various senses, which may not seem at all related, actually do relate to one another. Leasnam (talk) 15:31, 8 January 2015 (UTC)
Yes, that's the usual order, though the OED has this sense as number 54 out of 75. Both senses are more than a thousand years old, going back to Old English, so it's difficult to say which is earliest. I've swapped the order to see if anyone objects. Dbfirs 16:55, 8 January 2015 (UTC)
I like this better. Thank you! Leasnam (talk) 17:22, 8 January 2015 (UTC)
My view is that the "oldest first" order is unhelpful to the majority of readers, and is potentially misleading for English learners. I question whether it is "the usual order" for modern general-purpose dictionaries; the majority of dictionaries that I checked at http://www.onelook.com/?w=gay, for example, list the modern meaning first. I'm not saying that word development information is not of interest and should not be included in some form, of course. 109.153.227.154 18:06, 8 January 2015 (UTC)
I agree that oldest-first presentation is highly misleading for a general-purpose dictionary. We do have mechanisms for attaching the year of introduction to a sense or citation. Equinox 18:09, 8 January 2015 (UTC)
I hate oldest first. It's literally an attack on usability, an attempt to avoid making Wiktionary as easy to use as possible. Renard Migrant (talk) 19:45, 12 January 2015 (UTC)
The best thing for usability would be (i) to give the user the choice, so that they can sort the material by date, or frequency, or whatever (like sorting files by name, date, or size in Windows Explorer) and (ii) to default to something sane and reasonable, which would not be the date sort. Equinox 21:18, 13 January 2015 (UTC)

paidofilia, paidófilo, paidofobia[edit]

I think that these are the officially preferred forms (and for good reason, too). --66.190.99.112 14:53, 8 January 2015 (UTC)

I’m not sure which spelling of officially preferred. The pedofilia spelling seems to be much more common, but I agree with you that it is funny to see: pedofilia looks like it means "love of farts". —Stephen (Talk) 07:54, 9 January 2015 (UTC)
I guess 'officially preferred' means DRAE, right? Renard Migrant (talk) 21:46, 13 January 2015 (UTC)

aperfeiçoar[edit]

ipa pl

Added. —Stephen (Talk) 08:09, 9 January 2015 (UTC)

jark[edit]

"to jark' was a verb that artillery officer candidates used in Officer Candidate School (OCS) at Fort Sill, Oklahoma in 1967 to refer to the run we participated in our regular exercise program . . . clad in red shorts (artillery color) with white tee shirts and carrying the M1 Rifle up to the top of a peak on the base and then back. It was a hard run. We called it jarking. The jark, etc. Best, Bill Blackley, Captain US Army Artillery Reserve OCS Commission . . . now a retired physician

Whoever ends up archiving this page, please move this comment to Talk:jark. Equinox 22:06, 13 January 2015 (UTC)

biljardi[edit]

The English page for the Finnish "biljardi" gives, unlike e.g. the Finnish page, a numerical meaning. This numerical meaning is not used in Finnish. It might be understood by analogy with "miljardi" but is generally regarded incorrect. Usually "tuhat biljoonaa" is used for this meaning.

It's rarely used, just as in English, but it's an exaggeration to say that it would be "generally regarded as incorrect". I'll add a usage note. --Hekaheka (talk) 19:44, 13 January 2015 (UTC)

léprosé[edit]

I don’t think that léproséee is a word. --66.190.99.112 22:34, 10 January 2015 (UTC)

Fixed; thank you! —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 22:38, 10 January 2015 (UTC)

mumchance[edit]

For an example of usage of this word see The Jewel in the Crown by Paul Scott. Part Two "The MacGregor House". Early on Lady Chatterjee refers to Miss Crane as "mumpchance" - note the spelling.

strømpe[edit]

This is a Danish word.

tranquilo[edit]

I’m not 100% certain about this, but I think that this might be a Portuguese interjection that means O.K. or all right. --66.190.99.112 04:10, 13 January 2015 (UTC)

Added. — Ungoliant (falai) 14:30, 13 January 2015 (UTC)
I think that da [sic?] is used in the same fashion. Could be wrong, though. --Romanophile (talk) 19:19, 13 January 2015 (UTC)

plemenit[edit]

Kosovo je Srbija

avioliitto[edit]

If possible ask your contributors to add more example sentences with the corresponding translation in english and explain grammar thanks for existing

I added two examples. If you have a specific example in mind, write it here in English and I'll translate it for you. What exactly do you mean with "grammar explained"? --Hekaheka (talk) 19:23, 13 January 2015 (UTC)

Talk:develope[edit]

There are many words in the English language that have Old English spellings. This is one of those and is not incorrect. A common example of an outdated, Old English spelling of a word is "colour". I was taught in grade school that this was the proper English spelling of the word, but here in America we have simplified our language. We now spell it "color". If you have the opportunity, go to a library and find a really old book, something over a hundred years old. You will find many such oddities, quite possibly even the word develope.

I think you're confusing Old English with modern British English. Anyway, our entry for "develope" agrees with you that it's obsolete. Even in the UK nobody uses this spelling. Equinox 18:33, 13 January 2015 (UTC)
The spelling with an "extra e" was in common use up to about 1850 in American English and slightly later in British English, after which the form without the e at the end became the standard spelling. The situation is not at all the same as the word colour, but you are correct that "develope" should be marked as archaic rather than obsolete. Dbfirs 19:24, 13 January 2015 (UTC)
To someone who studies English, Old English, Middle English and obsolete English are distinct. This is I believe, obsolete English as datewise it falls in the Modern English period, but it is no longer used. Renard Migrant (talk) 21:58, 13 January 2015 (UTC)
Ah, that's not how I've seen the terms used elsewhere in Wiktionary. I agree that Old English and Middle English are clearly defined, but how do you distinguish between archaic and obsolete? I'm happy to restore obsolete if archaic means something different to you and to others here. What period would you say counts as archaic? Perhaps in this case we could just say "outmoded" since the variant was superseded fairly recently? Dbfirs 07:48, 14 January 2015 (UTC)
I think in reality, we don't distinguish between archaic and obsolete. Supposedly, archaic terms are still found occasionally in modern contexts, for example olde used for archaic effect in shop names. I think if we applied that, very few terms would really be archaic, but rather obsolete. Renard Migrant (talk) 18:36, 15 January 2015 (UTC)
For alternative spellings, there isn't a clear distinction between archaic and obsolete from what I've seen. But for actual words, the distinction is clear: obsolete is no longer recognised or understood, while archaic words are still understood. So really, most obsolete spellings would be archaic spellings. The difficulty is that spellings that are outmoded or belong to an obsolete standard are called "obsolete" even if they are still well understood. This is presumably because spelling is more normative than word usage. —CodeCat 22:46, 15 January 2015 (UTC)
Thanks. Perhaps a usage note indicating how recently the spelling was changed would be appropriate. Dbfirs 14:04, 16 January 2015 (UTC)

Pacific Gas and Electric Company : graft and extortion[edit]

what happen to the old articles on this subject?

There were none. This is a dictionary. Equinox 11:50, 14 January 2015 (UTC)

go down[edit]

your wiki is a little helpful but a little inapropriaate thank you

Depends what you mean by 'inappropriate'. If you want to know what blow job means, the appropriate thing for us to do is include it. Renard Migrant (talk) 18:28, 15 January 2015 (UTC)

achterzetsel[edit]

This is a Dutch word. It's like a preposition, except you place it after the word. A postposition if you will.

I added it now. Thank you! —CodeCat 22:41, 15 January 2015 (UTC)
I didn't realize he was saying that achterzetsel is the word for "postposition"; I thought he was saying it is a postposition, and I was wondering what it meant. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 22:51, 15 January 2015 (UTC)

OUTLOOK[edit]

Thanks for your help sincerely...Mr. Dale McCormick!!!

varia[edit]

The Italian word "varia" is also an adjective.

sommario[edit]

Hi, It is very useful dictionary . It would be much more better if you add pronounciation too. Thanks a lot.

Pronunciation added. —Stephen (Talk) 09:43, 18 January 2015 (UTC)

gooch[edit]

Hoped to find an etymology.

fermare[edit]

It's a fairly cool page you've created here.The structure is well made and you can find sought words quickly with all their relatives and with their origin.The design is cool,too. Greetings from Toronto :) Your Meyka (I know this name is seldom but somehow cool ,too.:))

etymology[edit]

I realize this is not an etymological dictionary, but if etymologies are going to be listed, shouldn't the source of the etymology be cited? I've seen several discussion threads about this but offhand don't see a policy about it. I was very surprised to see that there are no sources cited.

We tend to compare multiple sources. This isn't Wikipedia where every statement has to be referenced, but I suppose we could add references, especially if challenged on a particular etymology. Are there any particular etymologies that you would like references for? Dbfirs 09:17, 19 January 2015 (UTC)
We tend to not systematically list sources for etymologies. I'm not saying we don't use sources, just that we don't list them. Trying to have a supporting citation for everything means a lot of external links at the end of entries. For that reason we only give citations if an etymology is likely to be controversial. Nobody need a source to say that café is borrowed from French. Renard Migrant (talk) 16:40, 20 January 2015 (UTC)

superstructures[edit]

HI GOODDAY PLEASE CAN I NKOW HELIDECK UNDER WHICH SYSTEM

I can’t understand your question. —Stephen (Talk) 10:09, 20 January 2015 (UTC)
See helideck? Renard Migrant (talk) 16:38, 20 January 2015 (UTC)

faux pas[edit]

Thank you very much!!

goer[edit]

Very nice page. Good definitions and info. It would be great if you could integrate a list of synonyms for words that folks look up. That would be very useful

u pičku materinu[edit]

Just a note that I would enjoy a literal translation of the idiom as well. Does it not mean something along the lines of "into your mothers vagina?"

I believe so, click on the individual links u pičku materinu. Renard Migrant (talk) 20:44, 20 January 2015 (UTC)

Error in Russian verb article[edit]

The Russian verb entry "отражать" seems to need correction.

--Ijoh (talk) 15:50, 21 January 2015 (UTC)

Fixed. —Stephen (Talk) 15:57, 21 January 2015 (UTC)

There were several errors which broke grammar rules. Thanks for this wonderful service btw. I don't know how I would have learned Russian without it.

--Ijoh (talk) 16:12, 21 January 2015 (UTC)

octogenarian[edit]

Very good explanations!

kissing cousin[edit]

You are doing the whole humanity a service. all the Wiki sites, esp Wiki-Pedia, is my constant reference. Many times i even thought of editing some existing information. This I will do, from now on, but i should say the errors, if there were, were not serious at all, so I did not so far. But it gives me pleasure, to be a part of your endeavor. I still know a lot of people, who despite being net-literate, are not knowing about or using Wiki, and i keep telling them to do so. Question Google, and the answer is provided, 90 %, by the cited Wiki page. Thank you. All the best.

devincientur - Random Article[edit]

Can you please include translation for conjugated searches? Example would be "devincientur". When searched it says the form and type, but does not include the translation. you must go into the root word to find translation.

It is not feasible to do that. Many words have multiple meanings, and many languages have numerous noun cases and/or verb forms, and it would be an enormous job to copy the definitions from the citation form (the basic form) to all of the finite and inclined forms, and then adjust all of the definitions accordingly. Not only that, every time a change was made to one of the many forms, that change would have to be copied to all of the related forms. No dictionary does that or would even consider doing it. You have to click through to the citation form to find the definitions. —Stephen (Talk) 17:00, 22 January 2015 (UTC)

Word of the day: enthesis[edit]

excellent job!

isolati[edit]

The Italian word "isolati" is also an adjective.

せい[edit]

Hello Wikipedia!

I was wondering what is the diference between the chapters "Noun" and "Kanji reading". they look the same thing.

Thanks

epulis[edit]

Based on other websites and my own experience, the plural of "epulis" is "epulides" NOT "epulises"

You are correct. Epulises exists but it’s very rare. — Ungoliant (falai) 17:18, 23 January 2015 (UTC)

[edit]

steps 3 & 4 should be the same

Word of the day: lose face[edit]

Lose face is 2 word's? ..

Haha. Wyang (talk) 10:16, 27 January 2015 (UTC)

emotionology[edit]

Hello Wiktionary Team!

From your definition of the suffix -logy, I see that you acknowledge its two common uses.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/-logy

As an extension of the above, would you consider adding the second meaning of the word "emotionology" as the "study of emotions"?

I've recently attributed myself the label of "Emotionologist" because I'm simply captivated by the role, function, nature, and influence of emotions in our lives. It is my mission to educate and inspire people to better understand and leverage their emotions to achieve whatever version of success they aspire to. This said, I believe it will be easier to establish my credibility with readers if the language I'm using has some "official" online recognition.

By Feb. 1st, I will have launched my new website (REMOVED) which is meant to be the first online hub on Emotionology. Please know that I'm sharing these details only to give you a wider context for the intended use of the word and a clear vision of its potential impact on sparking the dialogue amongst emotions enthusiasts.

Thank you for considering my request. I truly look forward to your reply,

MC Lessard

We don't add words because someone on the Internet made them up. See if you can find uses that meet WT:CFI, e.g. in published books, proving that this meaning of the word is really used. Equinox 18:21, 25 January 2015 (UTC)
I can see some (but not much) usage with this sense - added. SemperBlotto (talk) 18:28, 25 January 2015 (UTC)

Wiktionary:Main Page[edit]

tifo[edit]

NOipa+italianINCOMPLETE

emotionology[edit]

NOipa

epulis[edit]

noIPA+MENTION-ises=V.RARE?

You may have noticed that people tend to ignore you. The reason for this is that your English (if it is English at all) is horrible and people can’t be bothered with trying to figure out what you’re on about. We also speak other languages here. Perhaps you could try to learn another language such as French or Spanish, and if you learn to write it correctly, we will be able to understand you. —Stephen (Talk) 05:30, 27 January 2015 (UTC)
I think you are being unfair. This is more intelligible than some of the things posted on WT:TRREQ to have them translated into Sanskrit. Also, we might be speaking with User:Sven70. Keφr 10:00, 27 January 2015 (UTC)

cruising[edit]

The second definition isn’t exactly useless, but it contains information that would look better elsewhere. --66.190.99.112 10:36, 26 January 2015 (UTC)

I've removed it as superfluous; the information is already at cruise (sense 4 of the verb). —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 20:22, 26 January 2015 (UTC)

bug-chasing[edit]

Lolwut? Why would somebody desire to contract HIV? I always thought that this expression meant engaging in sex whilst knowing that a participant still has a disease. --66.190.99.112 10:47, 26 January 2015 (UTC)

Explaining why people do this would be beyond the scope of a dictionary; you could read Wikipedia's article Bugchasing for more info. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 20:22, 26 January 2015 (UTC)

collocato[edit]

The Italian word "collocato" is also an adjective.

nubile[edit]

Please, enter Pronunciation.

For which language? The English pronunciation is already there. —Aɴɢʀ (talk) 09:05, 27 January 2015 (UTC)

cop on[edit]

noIPAsai