austere

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: austère

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French austere, from Latin austērus (dry, harsh, sour, tart), from Ancient Greek αὐστηρός (austērós, bitter, harsh), having the specific meaning "making the tongue dry" (originally used of fruits, wines), related to αὔω (aúō, to singe), αὖος (aûos, dry).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

austere (comparative austerer or more austere, superlative austerest or most austere)

  1. Grim or severe in manner or appearance
    The headmistress was an austere old woman.
  2. Lacking trivial decoration; not extravagant or gaudy
    The interior of the church was as austere as the parishioners were dour.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

austere f pl

  1. feminine plural of austero

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

austēre

  1. vocative masculine singular of austērus

Latvian[edit]

Noun[edit]

austere f (??? please provide the declension type!)

  1. oyster

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin austērus.

Adjective[edit]

austere m, f (plural austeres)

  1. austere; severe

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin austērus.

Adjective[edit]

austere m, f

  1. (of a flavor) acrid; bitter
  2. austere; severe