bint

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic بِنْت (bínt, girl, daughter), used to denote a patronym.

The term entered the British lexicon during the occupation of Egypt at the end of the nineteenth century, where it was adopted by British soldiers to mean "girlfriend" or "bit on the side". It is used as a derogatory slang word in the United Kingdom, meaning 'woman' or 'girl'. Its register varies from that of the harsher bitch to an affectionate term for a young woman, the latter being more commonly associated with the West Midlands. The term was used in British armed forces and the London area synonymously with bird in its slang usage (and sometimes brass) from at least the 1950s. The term has also famously been used in the classic film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, in which the Lady of the Lake is referred to as a "moistened bint", and in the phrase "grotty Scots bint" in the "English English" scene of the film Austin Powers in Goldmember. It also appears in the famed British sitcom Fawlty Towers, in which Basil Fawlty refers to his assistant Polly as a "cloth-eared bint."

In the Tyneside shipping industry , a Yemeni community had existed there (particularly in Laygate, in South Shields since the 1890's :- http://www.bbc.co.uk/nationonfilm/topics/family-and-community/south-shields-yemeni-riots.shtml The word entered the local language as it was Arabic for daughter. Although the term can be used in a derogatory sense, in general it refers simply to (usually young) females.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bint (plural bints)

  1. (UK, pejorative) A woman, a girl.
    Tell that bint to get herself in here now!
    Don't you remember the Crimbo din-din we had with the grotty Scots bint?
    • Monty Python's Flying Circus
      If I went round saying I was an emperor just because some moistened bint had lobbed a scimitar at me, they'd put me away!

Synonyms[edit]


Crimean Tatar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Binde.

Noun[edit]

bint

  1. bind, bandage

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bint n (plural binten)

  1. heavy wooden beam
  2. several beams, forming the structure of a building

Synonyms[edit]

2: gebint, gebinte


Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic بِنْت (bínt)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bint f (plural ulied or bniet)

  1. daughter

Usage notes[edit]

The word bint is usually used as the status constructus and with the pronominal suffixes. The morphological plural bniet today means girls. The plural form that specifically refers to daughters is ulied.

Related terms[edit]


Mòcheno[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German wint, from Proto-Germanic *windaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts (blowing).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bint m (please provide plural)

  1. wind (movement of atmospheric air)

References[edit]

  • Anthony R. Rowley, Liacht as de sproch: Grammatica della lingua mòchena Deutsch-Fersentalerisch, TEMI, 2003.