calf

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A cow and calf

From Old English cealf, from Proto-Germanic *kalbaz (compare Dutch kalf, German Kalb, Danish kalv), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷolbʰo 'womb, animal young' (compare Ancient Greek (Hesychius) δολφός (dolphós, womb), Avestan garəwa [script?] 'uterus', Sanskrit गर्भ (gárbha) 'womb'), from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (to swell).

Noun[edit]

calf (plural calves or calfs)

  1. A young cow or bull.
  2. Leather made of the skin of the calf; especially, a fine, light-coloured leather used in bookbinding.
  3. A young elephant, seal or whale (also used of some other animals).
  4. A chunk of ice broken off of a larger glacier, ice shelf, or iceberg.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Kane to this entry?)
  5. A small island, near a larger island.
    the Calf of Man
  6. A cabless railroad engine.
  7. (informal, dated) An awkward or silly boy or young man; any silly person; a dolt.
    • Drayton
      some silly, doting, brainless calf
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Calf of the leg

Old Norse kalfi, possibly derived from the same Germanic root as calf (young cow) (above).

Noun[edit]

calf (plural calves or calfs)

  1. (anatomy) The back of the leg below the knee.
  2. The muscle in the back of the leg below the knee.
    • 1988, Steve Holman, "Christian Conquers Columbus", Ironman, 47 (6): 28-34.
      Sure, his calves are a little weak, but the rest of his physique is so overwhelming, he should place high.


Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Anagrams[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch kalf, from Proto-Germanic *kalbaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

calf n (stem calv- or calver-)

  1. calf

Derived terms[edit]

Declension[edit]

case singular plural
nominative calf calver
genitive calves calver
dative calve calver(en)
accusative calf calver