chlamys

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Ancient Greek χλᾰμῠ́ς (khlamús).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chlamys (plural chlamydes)

  1. (historical) A short cloak caught up on the shoulder, worn by hunters, soldiers, and horsemen in Ancient Greece.
    • 1844, Walter Savage Landor, ‘Æsop and Rhosope’, Imaginary Conversations:
      He unfolded the chlamys, stretched it out with both hands before me, and then cast it over my shoulders.
    • 1977, Mary Carol Sturgeon, Sculpture: the Reliefs from the Theater, p. 38:
      A male god stands in three-quarter view to right, wearing a chlamys fastened at his right shoulder with a round clasp.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Ancient Greek χλᾰμῠ́ς (khlamús).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chlamys f (genitive chlamydos or chlamydis); third declension

  1. chlamys (a broad, woollen upper garment worn in Greece, sometimes purple, and inwrought with gold, worn especially by distinguished military characters, a Grecian military cloak, a state mantle; hence also, the cloak of Pallas; and sometimes also worn by persons not engaged in war, by, e.g., Mercury, Dido, Agrippina, children, actors, the chorus in tragedy, etc.)

Declension[edit]

Third declension, Greek type.
Number Singular Plural
nominative chlamys chlamydes
genitive chlamydos chlamydum
dative chlamydi chlamydibus
accusative chlamyda chlamydas
ablative chlamyde chlamydibus
vocative chlamy chlamydes
Third declension.
Number Singular Plural
nominative chlamys chlamydēs
genitive chlamydis chlamydum
dative chlamydī chlamydibus
accusative chlamydem chlamydēs
ablative chlamyde chlamydibus
vocative chlamys chlamydēs

Synonyms[edit]

  • (chlamys: military cloak): palūdāmentum (the Roman approximate equivalent)

References[edit]

  • chlămys” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • chlămy̆s” on page 301/2 of Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français (1934)
  • chlamys” on page 310/3 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1st ed., 1968–82)