elate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ēlātus (exalted, lofty), perfect passive participle of efferō (bring forth or out; raise; exalt), from ē (out of), short form of ex, + ferō (carry, bear).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

elate (third-person singular simple present elates, present participle elating, simple past and past participle elated)

  1. (transitive) To make joyful or proud.
  2. (transitive) To lift up; raise; elevate.

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

elate

  1. elated; exultant
    • Alexander Pope
      O, thoughtless mortals! ever blind to fate, / Too soon dejected, and dejected, and too soon elate.
    • Mrs. H. H. Jackson
      Our nineteenth century is wonderfully set up in its own esteem, wonderfully elate at its progress.
  2. (obsolete) Lifted up; raised; elevated.
    • Fenton
      with upper lip elate
    • Sir W. Jones
      And sovereign law, that State's collected will, / O'er thrones and globes, elate, / Sits empress, crowning good, repressing ill.

Quotations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From ēlātus (exalted, lofty), perfect passive participle of efferō (bring forth or out; raise; exalt), from ē (out of), short form of ex, + ferō (carry, bear).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ēlātē (comparative ēlātius, superlative -)

  1. loftily, proudly

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • elate in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879