exordium

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin exōrdium (beginning, commencement), from exōrdior (I begin, commence), from ex (out of, from) + ōrdior (I begin).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɛɡˈzɔːdɪəm/

Noun[edit]

exordium (plural exordiums or exordia)

  1. A beginning
  2. The introduction to a paper or discourse.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.17:
      Cicero thinks, in discourses of philosophy, the exordium to be the hardest part: if it be so, I wisely lay hold on the conclusion.
    • 1985, Anthony Burgess, Kingdom of the Wicked:
      This is a feeble article of faith to begin with, but it helps to push my pen through this exordium and what now follows.

Translations[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

exordium n (genitive exordiī); second declension

  1. beginning, commencement
  2. introduction, preface

Inflection[edit]

Second declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative exordium exordia
genitive exordiī exordiōrum
dative exordiō exordiīs
accusative exordium exordia
ablative exordiō exordiīs
vocative exordium exordia

Descendants[edit]