gaffer

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English gaffe (a hook) + -er. The natural lighting on early film sets was adjusted by opening and closing flaps in the tent cloths, called gaff cloths or gaff flaps.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gaffer (plural gaffers)

  1. (film) A chief lighting technician for a motion-picture or television production.
  2. A glassblower.
    Glassblowing is a glassforming technique that involves inflating molten glass into a bubble, or parison, with the aid of a blowpipe, or blow tube. A person who blows glass is called a glassblower, glassmith, or gaffer. (Wikipedia, 2012 November)
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Likely a contraction of godfather, but with the vowels influenced by grandfather. Compare French compère, German gevatter.

Noun[edit]

gaffer (plural gaffers)

  1. (colloquial) An old man.
  2. (UK) A foreman.
  3. An "Old Gaffer" is a sailor.
  4. In Maritime regions "the Little Gaffer" is the baby in the house.
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

gaffe +‎ -er

Verb[edit]

gaffer

  1. to make a gaffe; to mess up; botch up
  2. to gaffer tape

Conjugation[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Verb[edit]

gaffer

  1. to grasp