gauche

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French gauche (left, awkward), from gauchir (to veer, turn), from Old French gaucher (to trample, walk clumsily), from Frankish welkan (to full, trample), from Proto-Germanic *welk- (to full, roll up). Akin to Old High German walchan (to knead), Old English wealcian (to roll up, curl), Old Norse valka (to drag about). More at walk.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gauche (comparative more gauche, superlative most gauche)

  1. Awkward or lacking in social graces; bumbling.
    • (Can we date this quote?) "Seeking by vulgar pomp and gauche display" — Samuel Griswold (1793-1860)
    • 1879, George Meredith, The Egoist, chapter XLVI
      She looked a trifle gauche, it struck me; more like a country girl with the hoyden taming in her than the well-bred creature she is.
  2. (mathematics, archaic) Skewed, not plane.
  3. (chemistry) Describing a torsion angle of 60°

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

  • (lacking in social graces): adroit

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From gauchir (warp, distort), a conflation of Old French gauchier (tread) (from Frankish *walkan, cognate with English walk) + Old French guenchir (deviate) (from Frankish *wenkjan (sway, falter)). Gauche replaced the original word for "left", senestre, in the sixteenth century.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gauche (masculine and feminine, plural gauches)

  1. awkward, gawky
  2. left

Noun[edit]

gauche f (plural gauches)

  1. the left, the left-hand side

gauche m (plural gauches)

  1. (boxing) a left-hander, a southpaw

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gauche f (plural gauches)

  1. left