halse

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English hals, from Old English heals (neck, prow of a ship), from Proto-Germanic *halsaz (neck), from Proto-Indo-European *kols-, *ḱols- (neck). Cognate with Dutch hals (neck), German Hals (neck, throat), Swedish hals (neck, throat), Latin collum (neck).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

halse (plural halses)

  1. (anatomy, archaic) The neck; the throat.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English halsen, halchen, from Old English *halsian, *healsian (to embrace, literally to fall upon the neck of), from heals (neck). See above. Cognate with Old Saxon helsjen (to embrace), Old High German halsōn (German halsen (to jibe)), Icelandic hálsa (to embrace).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

halse (third-person singular simple present halses, present participle halsing, simple past and past participle halsed)

  1. (obsolete) To fall upon the neck of; embrace.
    • 1485, Syr Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Bk.VIII, Ch.xxj:
      soo the Kyng took a lytel hackney and but fewe felauship with him vntyl he came vnto sir Tristrams pauelione / and whanne syre Trystram sawe the Kynge / he ranne vnto hym and wold haue holden his styrope / But the kynge lepte from his hors lyghtly / and eyther halsed other in armes

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English halsen, halsien (to beseech, adjure), from Old English healsian, hālsian (to entreat earnestly, beseech, implore), from Proto-Germanic *hailisōną (to greet), from Proto-Indo-European *kailo-, *kailu- (whole, safe). Cognate with Middle High German heilsen (to predict), Swedish hälsa (to greet), Icelandic heilsa (to salute). More at whole, hailse.

Verb[edit]

halse (third-person singular simple present halses, present participle halsing, simple past and past participle halsed)

  1. (transitive) To greet; salute; hail.
  2. (transitive) To beseech; adjure.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English hals (neck), from Old Norse háls (neck, part of the forecastle or bow of a ship), from Proto-Germanic *halsaz (neck). See Etymology 1. Cognate with Danish hals (neck, tack).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

halse (plural halses)

  1. Alternative form of hawse

Verb[edit]

halse (third-person singular simple present halses, present participle halsing, simple past and past participle halsed)

  1. (obsolete) To haul; to hoist.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

halse c

  1. plural indefinite of hals

Verb[edit]

halse (imperative hals, infinitive at halse, present tense halser, past tense halsede, past participle har halset)

  1. bark
    Hunden halser: The dog is barking
  2. rush
    halse efter: rush after

Synonyms[edit]