hals

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Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hals.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hals c (singular definite halsen, plural indefinite halse)

  1. throat
  2. neck

Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

hals c

  1. genitive singular indefinite of hal

Verb[edit]

hals

  1. Imperative of halse.

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *hals, from Proto-Germanic *halsaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hals m (plural halzen, diminutive halsje n)

  1. (anatomy) neck

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

hals

  1. Romanization of 𐌷𐌰𐌻𐍃

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hals

Noun[edit]

hals m (definite singular halsen, indefinite plural halser, definite plural halsene)

  1. a neck
    en sår hals - a sore throat

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hals

Noun[edit]

hals m (definite singular halsen, indefinite plural halsar, definite plural halsane)

  1. a neck

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *halsaz, whence also Old English heals, Dutch hals, Old Saxon hals, Old High German hals, Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌻𐍃 (hals).

Noun[edit]

hals m

  1. neck

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hals.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hals c

  1. neck
  2. The gullet or windpipe.
  3. A narrow opening in a vessel such as a bottle

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]