hamper

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English[edit]

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A selection of wicker hampers.
An outline of a hamper.

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English hamper, contracted from hanaper, hanypere, from Anglo-Norman hanaper, Old French hanapier, hanepier (case for holding a large goblet or cup), from hanap (goblet, drinking cup), from Old Frankish *hnapp (cup, bowl, basin), from Proto-Germanic *hnappaz (cup, bowl). Cognate with Old High German hnapf (cup, bowl, basin) (German Napf (bowl)), Dutch nap (cup), Old English hnæpp (bowl). More at nap.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

hamper (plural hampers)

  1. A large basket, usually with a cover, used for the packing and carrying of articles or small animals; as,
    • a hamper of wine
    • a clothes hamper
    • an oyster hamper, which contains two bushels
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

hamper (third-person singular simple present hampers, present participle hampering, simple past and past participle hampered)

  1. (transitive) To put into a hamper.
    Competition pigeons are hampered for the truck trip to the point of release where the race back starts
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English hamperen, hampren (to hamper, oppress), probably of the same origin as English hamble (to limp), Scots hamp (to halt in walking, stutter), Dutch haperen (to falter, hesitate), German hemmen (to stop, hinder, check). More at hamble.

Verb[edit]

hamper (third-person singular simple present hampers, present participle hampering, simple past and past participle hampered)

  1. (transitive) To put a hamper or fetter on; to shackle; to ensnare; to inveigle; hence, to impede in motion or progress; to embarrass; to encumber.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

hamper (plural hampers)

  1. A shackle; a fetter; anything which impedes.
  2. (nautical) Articles ordinarily indispensable, but in the way at certain times.
Derived terms[edit]
  • Top hamper, (Nautical): unnecessary spars and rigging kept aloft.
Translations[edit]