harangue

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English arang and French harangue, from Old Italian aringa (modern Italian arringa) from aringare (speak in public) (modern Italian arringare), from aringo (public assembly), from Gothic *𐌷𐍂𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍃 (*hriggs)[1], akin to Old High German hring (ring) (whence German Ring).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /həˈræŋ/, /həˈreɪŋ/ (US)
  • Rhymes: -æŋ
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ha‧rangue

Noun[edit]

harangue (plural harangues)

  1. An impassioned, disputatious public speech.
  2. A tirade or rant, whether spoken or written.
    She gave her son a harangue about the dangers of playing in the street.
    The priest took thirty minutes to deliver his harangue on timeliness, making the entire service run late.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

harangue (third-person singular simple present harangues, present participle haranguing, simple past and past participle harangued)

  1. (transitive) To give a forceful and lengthy lecture or criticism to someone.
    The angry motorist leapt from his car to harangue the other driver.
    • 1814, Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, Ch XV:
      This picture of her consequence had some effect, for no one loved better to lead than Maria; and with far more good-humour she answered, "I am much obliged to you, Edmund; you mean very well, I am sure: but I still think you see things too strongly; and I really cannot undertake to harangue all the rest upon a subject of this kind. There would be the greatest indecorum, I think."

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ harangue” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French harangue (a public address, public discourse), from Old Italian aringo (arena, public square, platform), from Frankish *hring (circle, ring) or Gothic 𐌷𐍂𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍃 (hriggs, ring, circle), both from Proto-Germanic *hringaz (circle, ring), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)krengʰ- (to turn, bend), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (to turn, bend). Cognate with Old High German hring (circle, ring), Old English hring (circle, ring). Alternative etymology suggests the possibility that the Italian word may be derived from an Old Frankish compound *hari-hring (circular gathering, literally host-ring or army-ring). More at here, ring.

Noun[edit]

harangue f (plural harangues)

  1. harangue

Verb[edit]

harangue

  1. first-person singular present indicative of haranguer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of haranguer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of haranguer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of haranguer
  5. second-person singular imperative of haranguer

External links[edit]