mither

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Late 17th century, unknown origin, possibly Welsh moedrodd to worry or bother. Possible alternative from the Welsh meidda (to beg for whey) or perhaps meiddio (to dare or venture). Bear in mind that the "dd" in Welsh corresponds in sound to the "th" in mither, and English also has moider and moither.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mither (third-person singular simple present mithers, present participle mithering, simple past and past participle mithered)

  1. (intransitive, Northern England) To make an unnecessary fuss, moan, bother.
  2. (transitive) To pester or irritate someone. Usually directed at children.
    Will you stop mithering me!
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Late variant of Old English mōdor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mither (plural mithers)

  1. (Scotland and Northern England) mother

Anagrams[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French mirer (to look at; to watch), from Latin mīror, mīrārī (be amazed at).

Verb[edit]

mither

  1. (reflexive, s'mither) to look at oneself in the mirror

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Variant of mother, from Old English mōdor. Compare moder.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈmɪðər]
  • (Mid Northern Scots, Shetlandic) IPA(key): [ˈmɪdər]

Noun[edit]

mither (plural mithers)

  1. mother

Derived terms[edit]