orc

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See also: ORC

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French orque, Italian orca, and their source, Latin orca (type of whale).

Noun[edit]

orc (plural orcs)

  1. Any of several large, ferocious sea creatures, now especially the killer whale. [from 16th c.]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from Italian orco (man-eating giant); later revived by J. R. R. Tolkien, partly after Old English orc (demon).

Noun[edit]

orc (plural orcs)

  1. (fantasy, mythology) A mythical evil monstrous humanoid creature, usually quite aggressive. [from 17th c.]
    • 1656, Samuel Holland, Don Zara del Fogo, I.1:
      Who at one stroke didst pare away three heads from off the shoulders of an Orke, begotten by an Incubus.
    • 1834, "The National Fairy Mythology of England" in Fraser's Magazine for Town and Country, Vol. 10, p. 53:
      The chief exploit of the hero, Beowulf the Great, is the destruction of the two monsters Grendel and his mother; both like most of the evil beings in the old times, dwellers in the fens and the waters; and both, moreover, as some Christian bard has taken care to inform us, of "Cain's kin," as were also the eotens, and the elves, and the orcs (eótenas, and ylfe, and orcneas).
    • 1954, JRR Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring:
      There was a flash like flame and the helm burst asunder. The orc fell with cloven head.
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Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

orc m (plural orcs)

  1. An orc.

Old English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Compare Old Saxon ork.

Noun[edit]

orc m

  1. Cup, tankard.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin orcus.

Noun[edit]

orc m

  1. Demon.
  2. Hell.