puke

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See also: puķe and puķē

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

1581, first mention is the derivative pukishness (the tendency to be sick frequently). In 1600, "to spit up, regurgitate", recorded in the Seven Ages of Man speech in Shakespeare's As You Like It. Perhaps ultimately from Proto-Germanic *pukaną (to spit, puff), from Proto-Indo-European *bew- (to blow, swell). If so, then cognate with German pfauchen, fauchen (to hiss, spit). Compare also Dutch spugen (to spit, spit up), German spucken (to spit, puke, throw up), Old English spīwan (to vomit, spit). More at spew.

Noun[edit]

puke (countable and uncountable, plural pukes)

  1. (uncountable) vomit.
    • 2007, The Guardian, The Guardian Science blog, "The latest in the war on terror: the puke saber"
      the puke saber [...] pulses light over rapidly changing wavelengths, apparently inducing "disorientation, nausea and even vomiting"
  2. (countable) A drug that induces vomiting.
  3. (countable) A worthless, despicable person.
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Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

puke (third-person singular simple present pukes, present participle puking, simple past and past participle puked)

  1. (transitive and intransitive) To vomit; to throw up; to eject from the stomach.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
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Etymology 2[edit]

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Adjective[edit]

puke (not comparable)

  1. A fine grade of woolen cloth
    1599, William Shakespeare, 1 Henry IV, ii.4
    • Puke-stocking caddis garter
  2. A very dark, dull, brownish-red color.

References[edit]

  • wollencloth: Word Detective
  • The Universal Dictionary of English, 1896, 4 vols: "Of a dark colour, said to be between black and russet."

Hawaiian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English book.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

puke

  1. book

References[edit]

  • Hawaiian Dictionary, by Pukui and Elbert

Maori[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian, from Proto-Austronesian (compare Fijian buke, Hiligaynon bukid (mountain), Indonesian bukit, Malay bukit, Waray-Waray bukid (mountain)).

Noun[edit]

puke

  1. hill

Tagalog[edit]

Noun[edit]

puke

  1. vagina, female reproductive system.

Synonyms[edit]