sirene

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Bulgarian сирене (sirene), from Proto-Slavic, from Proto-Indo-European *suros, whence also English sour, German sauer.

Noun[edit]

sirene

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Wikipedia

  1. (uncommon) A slightly crumbly brine cheese made of cow-, sheep-, and/or goat-milk, similar to feta, which is popular in the Balkan peninsula.
    • 2006, M. H. Wolfe, Gone Away, page 65:
      [] then the potato pieces were layered on top and the mess was doused with olive oil and spices and cooked for an hour. Vlado made a tomato salad, also, with sirene cheese.
    • 2008, Martin Miller-Yianni, Simple Treasures in Bulgaria, page 209:
      My curiosity was now satisfied: nothing, other than potatoes, bread, garlic and sirene cheese.
    • 2011, Ken Albala, Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia, page 66:
      A strudel-like banitsa (pastry) is eaten, which is an interlayering of sirene cheese with phyllo pastry—though it may also contain leeks or spinach []

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

sirene (plural sirenes or sirenæ)

  1. (possibly dated) Alternative spelling of siren

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sirena, from Ancient Greek.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sirene f (plural sirenen or sirenes, diminutive sirenetje n)

  1. A siren, a dangerous nymph of Greek mythology, luring passers-by using an irresistible song
  2. (figuratively) A seductive but dangerous female
  3. (plural sirenes) A siren, a noisy warning device

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

sirene f

  1. plural form of sirena

Anagrams[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

sirene f (plural sirenes)

  1. Alternative form of sirena (alarm)