stray

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A stray dog wanders the streets.

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old French estraier (verb), and estrai (noun), from Vulgar Latin via strata, paved road[1].

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stray (plural strays)

  1. Any domestic animal that has an enclosure, or its proper place and company, and wanders at large, or is lost; an estray.
  2. (figuratively) One who is lost, either literally or metaphorically.
  3. The act of wandering or going astray.
  4. (historical) An area of common land or place administered for the use of general domestic animals, i.e. "the stray"

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

stray (third-person singular simple present strays, present participle straying, simple past and past participle strayed)

  1. (intransitive) To wander, as from a direct course; to deviate, or go out of the way.
    • Denham
      Thames among the wanton valleys strays.
  2. (intransitive) To wander from company, or from the proper limits; to rove at large; to roam; to go astray.
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) To wander from the path of duty or rectitude; to err.
  4. (transitive) To cause to stray.

Translations[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

stray (not comparable)

  1. Having gone astray; strayed; wandering; as, a stray horse or sheep.
  2. In the wrong place; misplaced.
    a stray comma

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ stray in Online Etymology Dictionary

Anagrams[edit]