systole

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See also: Systole

English[edit]

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The diastole (filling) and systole (pumping) processes of a healthy human heart

Etymology[edit]

From New Latin, from Ancient Greek συστολή (sustolḗ), from συστέλλειν (sustéllein, to contract), from σύν (sún, together) + στέλλειν (stéllein, send).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

systole (plural systoles)

  1. (physiology) The rhythmic contraction of the heart, by which blood is driven through the arteries.
    • 1972, Vladimir Nabokov, Transparent Things, McGraw-Hill 1972, pp. 78-9:
      A double systole catapulted him into full consciousness again, and he promised his uncorrected self that he would limit his daily ration of cigarettes to a couple of heartbeats.
    • 1974, Anthony Burgess, The Clockwork Testament:
      There is no essential virtue in comfort. To be relaxed is good if it is part of a process of systole and diastole. Relaxation comes between phases of tenseness.
  2. (prosody) A shortening of a naturally long vowel.

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Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From New Latin, from Ancient Greek συστολή (sustolḗ), from συστέλλειν (sustéllein, to contract), from σύν (sún, together) + στέλλειν (stéllein, send).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

systole f (plural systoles)

  1. (physiology) systole

Antonyms[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

From New Latin, from Ancient Greek συστολή (sustolḗ), from συστέλλειν (sustéllein, to contract), from σύν (sún, together) + στέλλειν (stéllein, send).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

systole f (plural systoles)

  1. (physiology) systole

Antonyms[edit]

External links[edit]