diastole

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See also: Diastole

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:

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The diastole (filling) and systole (pumping) processes of a healthy human heart

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek διαστολή (diastolē, separation, drawing asunder), from διά (dia, apart) + στέλλειν (stellein, send).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

diastole (usually uncountable, plural diastoles)

  1. (chiefly uncountable, physiology) The phase or process of relaxation and dilation of the heart chambers, between contractions, during which they fill with blood; an instance of the process.
    • 2005, Richard H. Vagelos, Rachel Marcus, J. Edwin Atwood, 35: Signs, Symptoms, and Laboratory Abnormalities in Cardiovascular Diseases, Robert M. Wachter, Lee Goldman, Harry Hollander (editors), Hospital Medicine, 2nd Edition, page 309,
      In patients with rapid rates, diastole may be sufficiently shortened that the third and fourth heart sounds become superimposed and form a summation gallop.
    • 2008, Jack H. Wilmore, David L. Costill, W. Larry Kenney, Physiology of Sport and Exercise, page 132,
      Of the total cardiac cycle at this rate, diastole accounts for 0.50 s, or 62% of the cycle, and systole accounts for 0.31 s, or 38%.
    • 2011, Julian Maizel, Michel Slama, 9: Hermodynamic Evaluation in the Patient with Arrhythmias, Daniel de Backer, Bernard P. Cholley, Michel Slama, Antoine Vieillard-Baron, Philippe Vignon (editors), Hemodynamic Monitoring Using Echocardiography in the Critically Ill, Springer, page 90,
      During a short cycle or premature contraction, LV ejection begins before pressure in the aorta has completely decreased, and it remains higher than with longer diastoles [4, 5].
  2. (uncountable, prosody) The lengthening of a vowel or syllable beyond its typical length.
    • 1815 March and June, On the Greek and Latin Accents, The Classical Journal, Volume XI, page 81,
      I have inserted diastole which is omitted in Putschius, an insertion which both the complement, and the subsequent text make necessary.
    • 1841, Gottfried Weber, Godfrey Weber′s General Music Teacher, page 115,
      [] according to prosody, this syllable has the diastole and the stress, whereas the second of “cujus” or of “animam” has not.
    • 2010, Jürgen Thym, Ann Clark Fehn, Of Poetry and Song: Approaches to the Nineteenth-Century Lied, page 46,
      Surely Goethe′s basic dichotomy of systole and diastole in the Divan poem [] .

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Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek διαστολή (diastolē, separation, drawing asunder).

Noun[edit]

diastole f (plural diastoles)

  1. (physiology) diastole

Antonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek διαστολή (diastolē, separation, drawing asunder).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

diastole f (plural diastoles)

  1. (physiology) diastole

Derived terms[edit]

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Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek διαστολή (diastolē, separation, drawing asunder).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /diˈastole/, [d̪i.ˈaː.st̪o.le]
  • Hyphenation: di‧à‧sto‧le

Noun[edit]

diastole f (plural diastoli)

  1. (physiology) diastole

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]