terp

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See also: TERP

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Shortening of interpreter.

Noun[edit]

terp (plural terps)

  1. (military or Deaf, slang) An interpreter (translator).
    • 2003 November 27, Paul Watson, “Losing Its Few Good Men”, in the Los Angeles Times:
      But for troops in the new Afghan army, there is a particular irritant: Afghan interpreters working with U.S. soldiers — called terps by troops in the field — can earn more than an Afghan army officer.
  2. (computing, slang) An interpreter (program that parses and executes another program).
    • 2009, "Dannii", IF System Idea (on newsgroup rec.arts.int-fiction)
      As far as I know all the TADS terps are just ports of the original.

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortening of terpene.

Noun[edit]

terp (plural terps)

  1. Any of various essential oils containing monoterpene alcohols which are added to a henna mix to darken the color.

Verb[edit]

terp (third-person singular simple present terps, present participle terping, simple past and past participle terped)

  1. (transitive) To add such an essential oil to (a henna mix).

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

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Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from West Frisian.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

terp m (plural terpen, diminutive terpje n)

  1. artificial mound or hillock used as shelter during high tide

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *þurpą, *þrepą (village, farmstead, troop), from Proto-Indo-European *trab-, *treb- (dwelling, room). Cognate with North Frisian torp, terp (village, fallow), Dutch dorp (village), German Dorf (hamlet, village, town), Danish torp (village), Swedish torp (farm, cottage, croft), Icelandic þorp (village, farm), Latin trabs (beam, rafter, roof), Lithuanian trōbà (farmhouse), Welsh tref (town), Albanian trevë (country, region, village).

Noun[edit]

terp c (plural terpen, diminutive terpke)

  1. artificial mound or hillock used as shelter during high tide
  2. (archaic) village; nowadays replaced by doarp, which is of Dutch origin