waiter

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Late 14th century, "attendant, watchman," agent noun from the verb wait. Sense of "servant who waits at tables" is from late 15th century, originally in reference to household servants; in reference to inns, eating houses, etc., it is attested from 1660s. Feminine form waitress first recorded 1834. [1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

a waiter

waiter (plural waiters)

  1. A male or sometimes female attendant who serves customers in a restaurant, café or similar.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 2, The Mirror and the Lamp[1]:
      She was a fat, round little woman, richly apparelled in velvet and lace, […]; and the way she laughed, cackling like a hen, the way she talked to the waiters and the maid, […]—all these unexpected phenomena impelled one to hysterical mirth, and made one class her with such immortally ludicrous types as Ally Sloper, the Widow Twankey, or Miss Moucher.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 5, The China Governess[2]:
      A waiter brought his aperitif, which was a small scotch and soda, and as he sipped it gratefully he sighed.
        ‘Civilized,’ he said to Mr. Campion. ‘Humanizing.’ […] ‘Cigars and summer days and women in big hats with swansdown face-powder, that's what it reminds me of.’
    Waiter! There's a fly in my soup.
  2. (literally) Someone who waits for somebody or something; a person who is waiting.
  3. (obsolete) A vessel or tray on which something is carried, as dishes, etc.; a salver.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/waiter?s=t