казак

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: қазақ and ҡаҙаҡ

Belarusian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old East Slavic козакъ (kozakŭ), from Turkic.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

каза́к (kazákm pers (genitive казака́, nominative plural казакі́, genitive plural казако́ў, feminine каза́чка)

  1. Cossack, cossack

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • казак” in Belarusian-Russian dictionaries and Belarusian dictionaries at slounik.org

Russian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old East Slavic козакъ (kozakŭ), from Turkic languages ("free, independent person, an adventurer, a drifter"), cognate to каза́х (kazáx, Kazakh).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

каза́к (kazákm anim (genitive казака́, nominative plural казаки́ or каза́ки, genitive plural казако́в or каза́ков, feminine каза́чка, related adjective каза́чий or каза́цкий, diminutive казачо́к)

  1. Cossack, cossack
  2. (obsolete) Kazakh
    Synonym: каза́х (kazáx)

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Danish: kosak
  • Finnish: kasakka
  • Romanian: cazac
  • Samic:
    • Kildin Sami: kаs (kas, servant)

Noun[edit]

каза́к (kazákm anim (genitive каза́ка, nominative plural каза́ки, genitive plural каза́ков, feminine каза́чка, related adjective каза́кский)

  1. (obsolete) Kazakh
    Synonym: каза́х (kazáx)

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • The older norm form "Cossack" was "коза́къ" (before 1918) and "коза́к" (till around 1960's) and the older norm for "Kazakh" was "каза́къ" (before 1918) and until 1936 "каза́к".
  • In modern Russian, the standard spelling for "Cossack" is only "каза́к", with two different stress patterns (b and d), e.g. plural "казаки́" or "каза́ки". For "Kazakh" only "каза́х" is the correct form with stress pattern "a".
  • According to Vasmer, "каза́ки" (stress pattern d) was influenced by Polish.

References[edit]

  • Vasmer, Max, “казак”, in Etimologičeskij slovarʹ russkovo jazyka [Etymological Dictionary of the Russian Language]‎[1] (in Russian), translated from German and supplemented by Oleg Trubačóv, Moscow: Progress, 1964–1973