Appendix:Glossary of Japanese sex terms

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This is a list of Japanese sex terms.

Contents: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


A[edit]

  • ahegao — the absurd facial expression made when a woman orgasms
  • ashikoki (足扱き, 足コキ) — using the feet to manipulate a sex partner's penis. The feet are often clad in pantyhose, cotton socks or even high heels. The pleasure is said to be as much psychological as physical[1].

B[edit]

C[edit]

E[edit]

F[edit]

G[edit]

  • gokkun (ゴックン) — This is the sound of swallowing to the Japanese. Gokkun movies usually feature a girl who after performing oral sex to one or several men plays with the spent sperm before swallowing it, those girls are called Gokkun Girls.

H[edit]

  • hentai (変態) — literally, "depraved" or "abnormal," typically used (outside of Japan) to refer to pornography in anime or manga.

I[edit]

  • image club — a type of brothel in which females dress in various types of clothing (race queen dresses, schoolgirl uniforms, etc.) and perform sexual favors according to several different fixed courses or "menus."

L[edit]

N[edit]

  • nakadashi — fetish of cumming inside the pussy; creampie.
  • netorare — fetish for being cheated on. A woman cheats with her significant other's knowledge and treats him poorly. The focus of these stories is on the cuckold.
  • netori — fetish for stealing another man's woman. The protagonist steals a woman from another man.

P[edit]

  • panchiraupskirts or panty viewing. According to sociologist Soichi Inoue, the interest dates back to the 1920s when Japanese women first adopted western-style undergarments, but "panchira culture" became more overt in the 1960s[5].
  • paizuritit fuck
  • pettanko — flat-chested
  • pink salon — A type of brothel specializing in oral sex. It has been reported that pink salons are among the most demanding places to work in the Japanese sex industry, with workers serving up to 50 customers per day, but the pink salons also function as gateways to more lucrative work in soaplands[6].

S[edit]

T[edit]

  • tamakeri — A fetish that involves men being kicked in the testicles. [8].
  • tekoki — The same as ashikoki, but with hands instead of feet.
  • telekura — an abbreviation for "telephone clubs", telephone-based dating services that often serve as fronts for prostitution. Advertised through flyers and stickers throughout Tokyo, the clubs are used to arrange meetings, generally between young women and older men.

U[edit]

Y[edit]

  • yaoi — A sub-set of ero (erotic)/hentai, sexually explicit comics (and doujinshi) about the love between males[9].
  • yuri — female/female homosexual comic or anime (lit: Lily)

Z[edit]

  • zenra (全裸) — literally translated as "completely nude", a genre of pornography in which the subjects are usually groups of women participating in everyday tasks that they might otherwise perform clothed.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ryann Connell, "Perverted punishers put foot down with tantalizing tootsies", Mainichi Daily News, June 6, 2005 online link
  2. ^ United States of America vs. Danilo Simoes Croce, United States District Court, Middle District of Florida online link
  3. ^ Geoff Botting, "Seems to be no stop to teen prostitution", [[w:Japan Times|]], August 1, 2006. online copy
  4. ^ Jonathan Watts, "Tokyo's sleaze zone is revealed as deathtrap", The Observer, September 2, 2001. online link
  5. ^ "Panty gazing research revealed" in Mark Schreiber, Tabloid Tokyo: 101 Tales of Sex, Crime and the Bizarre from Japan's Wild Weeklies, Oxford University Press, pp. 15-16.
  6. ^ Ayumi Sakai, A Look Inside the Sex Industry, [[w:Japan Today|]], July 25, 2005. online link
  7. ^ Jina Bacarr, The Japanese Art Of Sex: How to Tease, Seduce, and Pleasure the Samurai in Your Bedroom, Stone Bridge Press: Berkeley, Ca. 2004, pp. 185-188.
  8. ^ New adult videos deal a low blow to manhood, Mainichi Daily News, Sep. 2, 2002. online link
  9. ^ Mark J. McLelland, Male Homosexuality in Modern Japan: Cultural Myths and Social Realities, Routledge Curzon: 2000, pp. 54-55.