Ind

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See also: ind, IND, ind., Ind., in d., ind-, and -ind

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle French Inde, from Latin India.

Proper noun

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Ind

  1. (archaic, poetic) India; the East.
    • c. 1598–1600 (date written), William Shakespeare, “As You Like It”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act III, scene ii], line 84:
      From the east to western Ind, / No jewel is like Rosalind.
    • 1667, John Milton, “(please specify the page number)”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker []; [a]nd by Robert Boulter []; [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC:
      High on a throne of royal state , which far
      Outshone the wealth of Ormus and of Ind

Etymology 2

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Proper noun

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Ind

  1. Abbreviation of India.
  2. Abbreviation of Indonesia.

Anagrams

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Czech

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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Ind m anim (female equivalent Indka)

  1. Indian (related to India)
    • 1903, “Pouť”, in Ottův slovník naučný[1], part XX, Praha: J. Otto, page 351:
      Muhammedáni konají veliké p-ti do Mekky ke hrobu prorokovu, Indové k posvátnému Gangu.
      Muslims make large pilgrimages to Mecca, Indians to the sacred Ganges.
  2. male Indian (related to India)

Usage notes

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Declension

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Derived terms

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Further reading

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  • Ind in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • Ind in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Anagrams

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Old Irish

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Proper noun

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Ind ?

  1. the Indus (a river in India)