nid

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: NID, níd, nið, and níð

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Noun[edit]

nid

  1. (linguistics) Initialism of noun inanimate dependent.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French nid, from Latin nīdus, from Proto-Italic *nizdos (nest), from Proto-Indo-European *nisdós (nest).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nid m (plural nids)

  1. nest
    • 1976, Michel Fugain et le Big Bazar, "Le printemps".
      L'hirondelle et la fauvette, c'est la forêt qui me l'a dit / L'hirondelle et la fauvette, ont déjà fait leur nid
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. (military) Some people or dangerous things, hidden or not
    Nid de mitrailleuses
    machine gun nest
    Nid d'espions
    spy's nest

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nid

  1. inflection of nead:
    1. vocative/genitive singular
    2. nominative/dative plural

Lombard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Akin to Italian nido, from Latin nidus.

Noun[edit]

nid

  1. nest

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nīdus.

Noun[edit]

nid m (plural nids)

  1. (Guernsey) nest

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse níð, from Proto-Germanic *nīþą, sense 2 being a semantic loan from German Neid. Doublet of ni-.

Noun[edit]

nid n (definite singular nidet, uncountable)

  1. (archaic or historical) mockery, defamation, shame
  2. (literary) envy, hatred, animosity

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *nīþą. Cognate with Old English nīþ (English nithe), Old Norse níð.

Noun[edit]

nīd m

  1. envy
  2. hate
  3. malice

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle High German: nīt

References[edit]

  1. Köbler, Gerhard, Althochdeutsches Wörterbuch, (6. Auflage) 2014

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

nid

  1. not

References[edit]

  1. ^ Morris Jones, John (1913) A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative, Oxford: Clarendon Press, § 51 vi