Kitai

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See also: kitai

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Kitai,[1] from Khitan Khita-i.png or Khita-i small.png, Khitai(n),[2] probably via Uyghur خىتاي(xitay).[3] Cognate with Cathay and Russian Кита́й (Kitáj).

Proper noun[edit]

Kitai

  1. (historical ethnography) Synonym of Khitan, in its various senses.
    • c. 1913, The Encyclopaedia of Islam, Vol. IV, page 738:
      ḲARA KHITĀI (or ḲARĀ KHIṬĀI), the usual name since the vith (xiith) century in Muḥammadan sources for the Kitai people, mentioned by the Chinese from the eighth century A. D. onwards, who were probably Tunguz (according to another view Mongol)... From the beginning of the tenth century the Kitai carried on a campaign of conquest, conquered the northern part of China and founded a dynasty which as a Chinese ruling house was called Liao (916).

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Beazley, C. Raymond, ed. The Texts and Versions of John de Plano Carpini and William de Rubruquis as Printed for the First Time by Hakluyt in 1598... London: Hakluyt Society, 1904.
  2. ^ Omniglot.
  3. ^ Sinor, D. (1998) "The Kitan and the Kara Kitay" in History of Civilizations of Central Asia, Vol. IV, Pt. I, UNESCO, page 241.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Giovanni da Pian del Carpine's transcription[1] of Khitan [script needed] (Khita(n),[2] probably via Uyghur خىتاي(xitay).[3]

Proper noun[edit]

Kitai

  1. (historical ethnography) The Khitans: a former nomadic people of central Asia.
    • 1246, John de Plano Carpini, The Voyage of Johannes de Plano Carpini vnto the Northeast parts of the world, in the yeere of our Lord, 1246, Ch. 5, page 54:
      Naymani & Kara Kitai, id est, nigri Kitai, ex adverso in quandam vallem strictam inter montes duos, per quam nos euntes ad imperatorem eorum transiuimus, similiter conueniunt: & commissum est praelium, in quo Naymani & Kara Kitai a Mongallis sunt deuicti, & maior pars eorum occisa: & alii qui euadere non potuerunt in seruitutem redacti sunt.
      The Naimani also, and the people called Karakitay [that is, the black Kitay] assembled and banded themselues at a certaine straight valley, where, after a battell foughten they were vanquished by the Mongals. And being thus vanquished they were, the greater part of them, slaine; and others, which could not escape, were carried into captiuitie.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Beazley, C. Raymond, ed. The Texts and Versions of John de Plano Carpini and William de Rubruquis as Printed for the First Time by Hakluyt in 1598... London: Hakluyt Society, 1904.
  2. ^ Omniglot.
  3. ^ Sinor, D. (1998) "The Kitan and the Kara Kitay" in History of Civilizations of Central Asia, Vol. IV, Pt. I, UNESCO, page 241.

Veps[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Proper noun[edit]

Kitai (genitive Kitain, partitive Kitaid)

  1. China

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of Kitai
nominative sing. Kitai
genitive sing. Kitain
partitive sing. Kitaid
partitive plur.
singular plural
nominative Kitai
accusative Kitain
genitive Kitain
partitive Kitaid
essive-instructive Kitain
translative Kitaikš
inessive Kitaiš
elative Kitaišpäi
illative ?
adessive Kitail
ablative Kitailpäi
allative Kitaile
abessive Kitaita
comitative Kitainke
prolative Kitaidme
approximative I Kitainno
approximative II Kitainnoks
egressive Kitainnopäi
terminative I ?
terminative II Kitailesai
terminative III Kitaissai
additive I ?
additive II Kitailepäi