Lethe

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See also: lethe and Léthé

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin Lēthē, from Ancient Greek Λήθη (Lḗthē).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Lethe

  1. (Greek mythology) The personification of oblivion, daughter of Eris.
  2. (Greek mythology) The river which flows through Hades from which the souls of the dead drank so that they would forget their time on Earth.
    • 1782, Lethe, or Aesop in the shades: A dramatic satire, page 223
      come over—“But care, I suppose, is thirsty; and till they have drench’d themselves with Lethe, there will be no quiet among ’em” however, I’ll e’en to work; and so, friend Æsop, and brother Mercury, good bye to ye. [Exit Charon. AEs.]
    • 2015, Peter E. Meltzer, The Thinker's Thesaurus: Sophisticated Alternatives to Common Words (Expanded Third Edition), W. W. Norton & Company ISBN 9780393338973
      oblivion n.: Lethe. [In Greek mythology, Lethe (pronounced LEEthee) is one of the several rivers of Hades. Those who drink from it experience complete forgetfulness. Today it is used to refer to one in an oblivious or forgetful state.

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Ancient Greek Λήθη (Lḗthē).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Lēthē f (genitive Lēthēs); first declension (Greek)

  1. (Greek mythology) the river Lethe, the river of oblivion

Inflection[edit]

First declension, Greek type, with locative.

Case Singular
nominative Lēthē
genitive Lēthēs
dative Lēthae
accusative Lēthēn
ablative Lēthē
vocative Lēthē
locative Lēthae

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