N.

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Translingual[edit]

Noun[edit]

N. (plural Nn.)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of n.

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin N., or an abbreviation of name.

Alternative forms[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

N.

  1. (Christianity, liturgical) placeholder for a particular name to be specified
    • 1945, The Saint Andrew Daily Missal, page 972:
      Which in the first place, we offer up to Thee for Thy holy Catholic Church, that it may please Thee to grant her peace, to protect, unite and govern her throughout the world, together with Thy servant N. our Pope, N. our Bishop, and all true believers and professors of the Catholic and Apostolic Faith.
      Be mindful, O Lord, of Thy servants and handmaids N. and N. (the priest calls to mind the living he wants to pray for) and for all here present, whose faith and devotion are known to Thee, for whom we offer, or who offer up to Thee this sacrifice of praise for themselves and all those dear to them, for the redemption of their souls, the hope of their safety and salvation : who now pay their vows to Thee, the eternal, living and true God.
    • 1962, Roman Catholic Sunday Missal Booklet, Angelus Press, page 15:
      ℣. The continuation (or beginning) of the holy Gospel according to N.
      ℟. Glory be to Thee, O Lord.
Usage notes[edit]

Only appears in written texts (and is sometimes printed in red ink). When spoken, the person's name is said in its place.

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

N.

  1. Abbreviation of north.
  2. (grammar) Abbreviation of nominative case.

Adjective[edit]

N.

  1. Abbreviation of northern.
Usage notes[edit]

This is the customary abbreviation of this term as used in case citations. See, e.g., The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation, Nineteenth Edition (2010), "Case Names and Institutional Authors in Citations", Table T6, p. 430-431.


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Abbreviation of nōmen.

Alternative forms[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

N. m or f (indeclinable)

  1. (Christianity, liturgical) placeholder for a particular name to be specified
    • 1945, The Saint Andrew Daily Missal, page 972:
      In primis, quae tibi offérimus pro Ecclésia tua sancta cathólica : quam pacificáre, custodíre, adunáre, et régere dignéris toto orbe terrárum : una cum fámulo tuo Papa nostro N., et Antístite nostro N., et ómnibus orthódoxis atquae cathólicae, et apostólicae fídei cultóribus.
      Memento, Dómine, famulórum famulárumque N. et N. et ómnium circumstántium, quorum tibi fides cogníta est, et nota devótio, pro quibus tibi offérimus : vel qui tibi ófferunt hoc sacrifícium laudis, pro se, suísque ómnibus : pro redemptióne animárum suárum, pro spe salútis, et incolumitátis suae : tibíque reddunt vota sua aetérno Deo, vivo et vero.
      Which in the first place, we offer up to Thee for Thy holy Catholic Church, that it may please Thee to grant her peace, to protect, unite and govern her throughout the world, together with Thy servant N. our Pope, N. our Bishop, and all true believers and professors of the Catholic and Apostolic Faith.
      Be mindful, O Lord, of Thy servants and handmaids N. and N. and for all here present, whose faith and devotion are known to Thee, for whom we offer, or who offer up to Thee this sacrifice of praise for themselves and all those dear to them, for the redemption of their souls, the hope of their safety and salvation : who now pay their vows to Thee, the eternal, living and true God.
    • 1962, Roman Catholic Sunday Missal Booklet, Angelus Press, page 14:
      ℣. Sequéntia (sive Inítium) sancti Evangélii secúndum N.
      ℟. Glória tibi, Dómine.
      ℣. The continuation (or beginning) of the holy Gospel according to N.
      ℟. Glory be to Thee, O Lord.