New English

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English[edit]

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Proper noun[edit]

New English

  1. The form of the English language spoken since the Great Vowel Shift in England, completed in roughly 1550.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

New English (plural New Englishes or New English)

  1. A variety of English that has come into being in a region where English was a former colonial language or is a foreign language.
    • 2012, James Lambert, “Beyond Hobson-Jobson: A new lexicography for Indian English”, in World Englishes[1], page 305:
      Nevertheless, a certain amount of schizophrenia pertains to the study of World Englishes as New Englishes, for while new Englishes are regarded as valid varieties in their own right, the description and delineation of them in linguistic terms is conducted through the gaze of native-speaker norms.
  2. (historical, uncommon, in the plural) New Englanders.
    • 1643, Roger Williams, A Key into the Language of America, London: Gregory Dexter, OCLC 41412195, page 11:
      This Southwest wind is called by the New-English, the Sea turne, which comes from the Sunne in the morning, about nine or ten of the clock Southeast, and about South, and then strongest Southwest in the after-noone, and towards night, when it dies away.
    • 1647, Anonymous, The Day-Breaking, if not the Sun-Rising of the Gospell with the Indians in New-England, London: Richard Cotes; republished as “The Day-Breaking [] ”, in MHS Collections, series 3, volume 4, Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1834, OCLC 1756821, page 22:
      Another complayned of other Indians that did revile them, and call them Rogues and such like speeches for cutting off their Locks, and for cutting their Haire in a modest manner as the New-English generally doe
    • 1920, Katharine Fullerton Gerould, “Miss Alcott's New England”, in Modes and Morals, New York: C. Scribner's sons, OCLC 549537, page 195:
      Any honest New Englander—a New Englander of the villages, I mean—will admit that the New English are singularly ungifted for social life and manners.
    • 2001, Alan Taylor, American Colonies, New York: Viking Penguin, →ISBN, page 176:
      New England’s fisheries and the carrying trade to the West Indies demanded ships. By the end of the seventeenth century, the New English were building almost all of the vessels they employed, as well as growing numbers for English merchants.
  3. (historical, in the plural) English settlers who arrived in Ireland in the 16th and 17th centuries, as distinguished from previous Anglo-Norman invaders (the Old English).
    • 1976, Aidan Clarke, “Selling Royal Favours, 1624–32”, in T. W. Moody et al., editors, A New History of Ireland, volume 3, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN, page 235:
      It was already evident that the degree of influence that the New English could exert in Ireland was becoming severely restricted by governmental practices that tended to concentrate effective power in England.
    • 1987, Nicholas P. Canny, From Reformation to Restoration, Dublin: Helicon, →ISBN, page 180:
      Instead of exporting hides and raw wool, the New English established communities devoted to tanning and weaving, and the towns of Tallow and Bandonbridge in Munster came to be recognised as model manufacturing towns.
    • 1991, Peter R. Newman, “New English”, in Companion to Irish History, 1603–1921, Oxford: Facts On File, →ISBN, page 132:
      The New English came to control Ireland — their ultimate expression was the powerful ascendancy which enjoyed exclusive political power in the country for more than a century, and which fought a dogged rearguard action against diminution of its power during the nineteenth century.

Synonyms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

New English (comparative more New English, superlative most New English)

  1. (uncommon, historical) Of or pertaining to New England.
    • 1644, Roger Williams, The Bloudy Tenent [] ; republished as The Bloudy Tenent [] , London: J. Haddon, 1848, OCLC 1885372, page 243:
      Thirdly, since those persons in the New English plantations accounted unfit for church estate, yet remain all members of the church of England, from which New England dares not separate, no not in their sacraments (as some of the independents have published), what riddle or mystery, or rather fallacy of Satan is this!
    • 1647, Anonymous, The Day-Breaking, if not the Sun-Rising of the Gospell with the Indians in New-England, London: Richard Cotes; republished as “The Day-Breaking [] ”, in MHS Collections, series 3, volume 4, Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1834, OCLC 1756821, page 15:
      [] as it was with our New-English ground when we first came over, there was scarce any man that could beleeve that English graine would grow, or that the Plow could doe any good in this woody and rocky soile.
    • c. 1659, Rhode Island Court of Commissioners, [Address to Cromwell]; republished as “The Colony of Rhode Island to Richard Cromwell”, in MHS Collections, series 2, volume 7, Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1818, OCLC 1042144733, page 88:
      May it please your highness to know, that this poor Colony of Providence Plantations, mostly consists of a birth and breeding of the providence of the Most High. We being an outcast people, formerly from our mother nations in the Bishops days, and since from the rest of the New English over zealous Colonies
    • 1974, James Axtell, The School upon a Hill, New Haven: Yale University Press, →ISBN, page 6:
      Until and even after the American Revolution, the New English child was formed in the religious image of his Puritan ancestors.
    • 1999, Jim Egan, Authorizing Experience, Princeton: Princeton University Press, →ISBN, page 95:
      It is an article of faith among scholars of colonial American culture that American national consciousness can be traced to the experiences of New English colonists in the latter half of the seventeenth century.
    • 2020, Christoph Strobel, Native Americans of New England, Santa Barbara: Praeger, →ISBN, page 100:
      King Philip's War was, however, not a war between New English colonists on the one side and Native Americans on the other but instead was a complicated intercultural conflict.
  2. (historical) Of or pertaining to English settlers who arrived in Ireland in the 16th and 17th centuries.
    • 1991, Peter R. Newman, “New English”, in Companion to Irish History, 1603–1921, Oxford: Facts On File, →ISBN, page 132:
      The New English settlers, whose numbers increased during plantation, and particularly during the land settlement of the 1650s following upon the suppression of the Irish rebellion of 1641-53, were never numerically dominant.
    • 2002 [1985], Hans S. Pawlisch, Sir John Davies and the Conquest of Ireland (Cambridge Studies in the History and Theory of Politics), first paperback edition, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 111:
      As a Catholic lawyer and land-owner with Gaelic connections, Barnewall represented everything repugnant to full extension of New English rule in Ireland.
    • 2014 [2007], Rosemary O'Day, Women's Agency in Early Modern Britain and the American Colonies, New York: Routledge, →ISBN, page 15:
      During our period the English colonised parts of Ireland (although Old English or Anglo-Norman families were to some extent already integrated into native Irish culture and society), and certainly by the end of the sixteenth century, sought to impose English political rule over the whole island. The New English aristocrats who were now responsible for Ireland's rule more often than not did not bring their wives and families to live in Ireland.

See also[edit]