Talk:ab aeterno

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RFV[edit]

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The following discussion has been moved from Wiktionary:Requests for verification.

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Entered as Spanish, not Latin. Spanish Wiktionary has a link to an entry in an old dictionary, and Google mostly has references to an episode of Lost. Is this an actual Spanish term, or is it just a Latin phrase (which, by the way, looks too SOP to merit its own entry)? Chuck Entz (talk) 11:09, 5 May 2012 (UTC)

It is only Latin, it’s not Spanish. I think it’s a set phrase in Latin and should have an entry. The Spanish Wiktionary link refers to the RAE dictionary, which explains that it is a Latin locution and gives its meaning in Spanish. From the parts, one might think it means "from eternity", but what does "from eternity" mean? —Stephen (Talk) 11:35, 5 May 2012 (UTC)
It does not quite mean "from eternity". The Latin word for eternity is aeternitas, but aeternus is an adjective, meaning that in this case it must be a substantive ("from the endless thing"). That translation, however, makes no sense to me. --Μετάknowledgediscuss/deeds 19:43, 5 May 2012 (UTC)
It also has an entry for English, as I have found it in my 1976 W 3rd NWID. Speednat (talk) 17:08, 21 June 2012 (UTC)
@Μετάknowledge: It seems pretty comparable to English since always or since forever. —RuakhTALK 20:32, 21 June 2012 (UTC)

{{look}}

I've added an RFV tag to the English section as well. Anyone want to cite this term in either language? - -sche (discuss) 20:23, 1 October 2012 (UTC)
google books:"or ab aeterno" and similar searches turn up sufficiently many hits for this to pass RFV, I just can't work out what sense they use the term in. - -sche (discuss) 22:29, 11 October 2012 (UTC)
Meh, I've passed the English sense and detagged the Latin senses per Stephen; combine the two Latin senses if you like. - -sche (discuss) 01:31, 15 October 2012 (UTC)