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Main definition[edit]

I removed all the synonyms and near-synonyms, as they didn't belong in the main definition. Many of those words are already included under the Synonyms section. I also weakened the sense of the definition, as I didn't think the "great" and "very" were necessarily part of the definition; the idea here is to define a word, not to get all lyrical. Feel free to revert either change if the consensus disagrees with me. Paul Willocx 00:08, 14 February 2007 (UTC)

Thai translation[edit]

The Thai word is สุนทร; can this be added under "Translations"? 18:52, 16 December 2009 (UTC)

Deletion discussion (RFD-sense)[edit]

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Sense 4 is redundant to sense 1 (it defines beautiful as "beautiful"!) – you could use basically any generically positive adjective this way (stunning! fabulous! great! incredible! smashing! wonderful! glorious! super! nice! magical!). Sense 5 is just ironic inversion of the usual sense, and we have long had an informal policy to exclude these (which reminds me, I should probably start Wiktionary:Votes/pl-2015-03/Excluding most sarcastic usage from CFI). Smurrayinchester (talk) 09:19, 25 September 2015 (UTC)

It's a silly entry, a bit like defining the imperative of verbs separately as interjections (like "march", "run!" and so on) and should be deleted. Also sarcasm isn't a property of a word, but of a sentence, paragraph or even a string of paragraphs. The word beautiful is not sarcastic on its own. Renard Migrant (talk) 10:52, 25 September 2015 (UTC)
Agreed, although I would say that the example sentences for senses 4 and 5 both use sense 3 as an interjection, with and without irony. I'm surprised these entries have survived for eight and a half years (added February 2007). I don't think that being a "pro-sentence" (which sounds like jargon to me, since it just seems to be an interjection with a specific meaning) justifies a separate entry for praise and another for sarcasm. P Aculeius (talk) 12:12, 25 September 2015 (UTC)
Delete. Virtually any word can be used sarcastically. --Romanophile (contributions) 02:45, 8 October 2015 (UTC)

Deleted. bd2412 T 16:58, 27 October 2015 (UTC)