glorious

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English glorious, from Anglo-Norman glorius and Old French glorïos, from Latin glōriōsus. Displaced native Middle English wulderful, from Old English wuldorfull (glorious), among other terms. Equivalent to glory +‎ -ous.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡlɔː.ɹi.əs/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɡlɔɹ.i.əs/
  • (file)
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /ˈɡlɒ.ɹi.əs/[1]
  • Rhymes: -ɔːɹiəs

Adjective[edit]

glorious (comparative more glorious or gloriouser, superlative most glorious or gloriousest)

  1. Exhibiting attributes, qualities, or acts that are worthy of or receive glory.
    glorious deeds
  2. Excellent, wonderful; delightful.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book V”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      These are thy glorious works, Parent of good.
    • 2012 August 23, Alasdair Lamont, “Hearts 0-1 Liverpool”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      Borini missed another glorious opportunity to give his side the lead after brilliant set-up play by Sterling, but with only the exposed keeper to beat, he struck the post.
  3. Bright or shining;
    Synonyms: splendid, resplendent, bright, shining
  4. (obsolete) Eager for glory or distinction
  5. (obsolete) Excessively proud or boastful.
    Synonyms: haughty, boastful, ostentatious, vainglorious
  6. (archaic, colloquial) Ecstatic; hilarious; elated with drink.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dobson, E. J. (1957) English pronunciation 1500-1700[1], volume II: Phonology, second edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, published 1968, OCLC 1300760, page 485.

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman glorius, glorios, glorieus, from Latin glōriōsus; equivalent to glory +‎ -ous.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌɡlɔːriˈuːs/, /ˌɡlɔriˈuːs/
  • (with reduction) IPA(key): /ˈɡlɔːrius/, /ˈɡlɔrius/, /-rjus/

Adjective[edit]

glorious (comparative gloriousere, superlative gloriosest)

  1. Recognised, acclaimed, well-known; having an excellent reputation.
  2. Deserving religious recognition or commendation; godly.
  3. Marvelous or wonderful to the senses: attractive, pleasing.
  4. Amazing, great; possessing quality or a good reputation.
  5. (rare) Vain, bragging, self-aggrandising.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: glorious

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin glōriōsus.

Adjective[edit]

glorious m (oblique and nominative feminine singular gloriouse) (Anglo-Norman)

  1. glorious
    • 13th century, Unknown, La Vie de Saint Laurent, page 11, column 2, line 2:
      dunc dist Damnedeu glorious
      so, he says [to] glorious God

Declension[edit]