elate

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English elat, elate, from Latin ēlātus (exalted, lofty), perfect passive participle of efferō (bring forth or out; raise; exalt), from ē (out of) (short form of ex) + ferō (carry, bear).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈleɪt/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Verb[edit]

elate (third-person singular simple present elates, present participle elating, simple past and past participle elated)

  1. (transitive) To make joyful or proud.
  2. (transitive) To lift up; raise; elevate.

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

elate

  1. elated; exultant
    • 1714, Alexander Pope, “The Rape of the Lock”, in The Works of Mr. Alexander Pope, volume I, London: [] W[illiam] Bowyer, for Bernard Lintot, [], published 1717, OCLC 43265629, canto III:
      Oh thoughtless Mortals! ever blind to Fate,
      Too soon dejected, and dejected, and too soon elate.
    • 1895, Helen Hunt Jackson, The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, Volume 28
      Our nineteenth century is wonderfully set up in its own esteem, wonderfully elate at its progress.
  2. (obsolete) Lifted up; raised; elevated.
    • c. 1707, Elijah Fenton, a letter to the Knight of the Sable Shield
      with upper lip elate
    • a. 1794, William Jones, an ode in imitation of Alcaeus
      And sovereign law, that State's collected will, / O'er thrones and globes, elate, / Sits empress, crowning good, repressing ill.

Quotations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Verb[edit]

elate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of elama

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From ēlātus (exalted, lofty), perfect passive participle of efferō (bring forth or out; raise; exalt), from ē (out of), short form of ex, + ferō (carry, bear).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ēlātē (comparative ēlātus or ēlātius, no superlative)

  1. loftily, proudly
    • c. 177, Gellius: Noctes Atticae, Book 9, Chapter 15, Verse 4
      Introit adulescens et praefatur arrogantius et elatius, quam aetati eius decebat, ac deinde iubet exponi controversias.
      The young fellow entered the room, made some preliminary remarks in a more arrogant and presumptuous style than became his years, and then asked that subjects for debate be given him.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek ἐλάτη (elátē).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

elatē f (genitive elatēs); first declension

  1. A sort of fir
  2. The leaf of the palm bud
Declension[edit]

First-declension noun (Greek-type).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative elatē elatae
Genitive elatēs elatārum
Dative elatae elatīs
Accusative elatēn elatās
Ablative elatē elatīs
Vocative elatē elatae

References[edit]

  • elate in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • elate in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • elate in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Middle English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

elate

  1. Alternative form of elat