Talk:either

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Is the sense "each" non-standard? It seems to contradict the sense of "one or other" (but not both). — Paul G 11:00, 24 Jun 2004 (UTC)

I don't know such a sense? Can you give examples? — Hippietrail 12:21, 24 Jun 2004 (UTC)
I've checked - this is acceptable usage. I give an example in the page ("a door at either end of the room" = "a door at each end of the room") — Paul G 08:56, 25 Jun 2004 (UTC)
Oh you should've said, yes I know this usage. It's a different sense since it actually means "both" rather than "each", and of course only works with two things. — Hippietrail 11:05, 25 Jun 2004 (UTC)

SAMPA needs to be corrected. — Paul G 11:00, 24 Jun 2004 (UTC)

I've improved the pronunciation section. — Hippietrail 12:21, 24 Jun 2004 (UTC)
Thanks. — Paul G 08:56, 25 Jun 2004 (UTC)

Is "either" also an adverb, as in "I don't like him and I don't like her either"? — Paul G 11:15, 24 Jun 2004 (UTC)

I guess so. It has such a specific set of grammatical functions that it's hard to put it in generic categories. If it weren't in a western European language it would probably be called a particle... — Hippietrail 12:21, 24 Jun 2004 (UTC)
Again, I've checked, and this is the case. I'll put it in now. — Paul G 08:56, 25 Jun 2004 (UTC)

Pronunciations[edit]

My pronunciation might just be Americanized, but as a Canadian, I use both pronunciations interchangeably. I am about to remove the {{a}} tags because after the addition of Canada, they are going to be the exact same. —Internoob (DiscCont) 23:12, 13 May 2010 (UTC)