Turkmen

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See also: turkmen, türkmén, and Türkmen

English[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The current majority view for the etymology of the ethnonym Türkmen or Turcoman is that it comes from Türk and the Turkic emphasizing suffix -men, meaning "'most Turkish of the Turks' or 'pure-blooded Turks.'"[1] A folk etymology, dating back to the Middle Ages and found in al-Biruni and Mahmud al-Kashgari, instead derives the suffix -men from the Persian suffix -mānind, with the resulting word meaning "like a Turk". While formerly the dominant etymology in modern scholarship, this mixed Turkic-Persian derivation is now viewed as incorrect.[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Turkmen

  1. plural of Turkman

Noun[edit]

Turkmen (countable and uncountable, plural Turkmen or Turkmens)

  1. (countable) A person from Turkmenistan or of Turkmen descent.
    • 2005, Chahryar Adle, History of Civilizations of Central Asia (page 316)
      The conquest took 16 years and ended in 1885 in a battle with the Afghans on the banks of the Murghab. During this period, the Turkmens offered the Russians stubborn resistance []
    • 2009, Barbara A. West, Encyclopedia of the Peoples of Asia and Oceania (page 841)
      Keimir-Ker, a Turkmen from the Tekke clan, led a rebellion against the Persians []
  2. (uncountable) A Turkic language of the Turkmen spoken mostly in Turkmenistan.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Turkmen (not comparable)

  1. Of, from, or pertaining to Turkmenistan, the Turkmen people or the Turkmen language.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Clark, Larry (1996) Turkmen Reference Grammar[1], Harrassowitz, →ISBN, page 4, Annanepesov, M. (1999), “The Turkmens”, in History of civilizations of Central Asia, Motilal Banarsidass, →ISBN, page 127, Golden, Peter (1992) An introduction to the history of the Turkic peoples : ethnogenesis and state-formation in the medieval and early modern Eurasia and the Middle East, Harrassowitz, pages 213–214.
  2. ^ Clark, Larry (1996) Turkmen Reference Grammar[2], Harrassowitz, →ISBN, pages 4–5,Annanepesov, M. (1999), “The Turkmens”, in History of civilizations of Central Asia, Motilal Banarsidass, →ISBN, page 127,Golden, Peter (1992) An introduction to the history of the Turkic peoples : ethnogenesis and state-formation in the medieval and early modern Eurasia and the Middle East, Harrassowitz, pages 213–214.

Further reading[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Turkmen m anim (feminine Turkmenka)

  1. Turkmen, Turkoman, Turkman (person)

Related terms[edit]